February 2022 - rfxcel.com
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Antares Vision Group Acquires ACSIS

AVG Chairman & Co-CEO Emidio Zorzella says the acquisition will allow Antares Vision Group to enter the multi-billion-dollar returnable asset management market.

Reno, Nevada, Feb. 15, 2022 (EINPRESSWIRE).  Antares Vision Group (AVG), a leading global provider of hardware and software track and trace solutions and one of the major players in inspection systems and smart data management, today announced that it had acquired ACSIS Inc. through its fully controlled company rfxcel for an enterprise value of $12 million.

Founded in 1996, ACSIS has been providing solutions and services to Fortune 1000 manufacturing companies with some of the most complex and highly regulated supply chains in the world for more than 20 years. It delivers innovative software solutions and services to companies with complex warehouse, distribution, and packaging challenges, assists with their data collection requirements for track and trace and inventory optimization through their supply chains, and delivers seamless integration of information to their ERP systems. ACSIS has had zero churn among its Top 10 customers, which include DuPont, Cintas, BIMBO, Hershey and Coca-Cola. AVG will retain ACSIS’ highly experienced and proven executive team.

“The ACSIS acquisition will further strengthen our unique end-to-end solution for the digital supply chain,” rfxcel CEO Glenn Abood said. “It will provide new customers and allow us to enter into new industry verticals, as well as into the relevant returnable asset management market, extending our presence in the United States.”

ACSIS CEO Jeremy Coote said the acquisition brought together industry-leading organizations and technologies. “For more than 20 years, our incredibly talented team has been at the forefront of creating some of the most sophisticated supply chain visibility solutions for manufacturing companies around the world,” he said. “The combination of Antares Vision Group’s world-class talent with ACSIS technology, domain expertise, and commitment to innovating supply chain ecosystems will help ensure our success in an increasingly competitive industry.”

With its deep domain expertise in data collection and serialization, ACSIS in 2019 launched the ACSIS Cloud Platform, a next-generation cloud-based supply chain visibility platform that spans data collection to business process to real-time analytics and uniquely enables personalized, private supply chain edge ecosystems. The ACSIS Cloud Platform solves the toughest supply chain visibility challenges, including:

Product traceability: item-level tracking using serialization, barcodes, RFID, and other sensors; edge data collection; visibility across multi-partner ecosystems to ensure regulatory compliance, improve public safety, and enable sustainable supply chains

Returnable asset management: tracks returnable transport items (RTIs) across the extended supply chain in real time to deliver accurate inventory status; ensures compliance and efficiency; controls shrinkage and ensures proper maintenance and inspection of RTIs; predicts demand to support improved planning and customer service

Partner collaboration: integrates with partners across operating ecosystems; delivers real-time supply chain and production visibility; creates more transparent and agile supply chains; maintains common enterprise standards; ensures consistent serialization data and uniform product labeling

About Antares Vision Group

Antares Vision Group is an outstanding technology partner in digitalization and innovation for enterprises and institutions, guaranteeing the safety of products and people, business competitiveness, and environmental protection. Antares Vision Group is a technological enabler of supply chain transparency and sustainable transition to protect business competitiveness and the uniqueness of each country. It provides a unique and comprehensive ecosystem of technologies to guarantee product quality (inspection systems and equipment) and end-to-end product traceability (from raw materials and production to distribution to the consumer), with integrated data, production and supply chain management, also achieved through the application of artificial intelligence and the use of blockchains.

Antares Vision Group is active in the life sciences sector (pharmaceutical, biomedical devices, and hospitals), in the beverage, food, and cosmetics industries, and has potential in other sectors. The world leader in track and trace systems for pharmaceutical products, it provides major global manufacturers (more than 50 percent of the Top 20 multinationals) and numerous government authorities with solutions to monitor their supply chains and validate product authenticity.

Listed since April 2019 on the Italian Stock Exchange in the Alternative Investment Market (AIM) segment and from May 14, 2021, in the STAR segment of the Mercato Telematico Azionario (MTA) (electronic equity market), Antares Vision Group recorded a turnover of Euro 162 million in 2020, operates in 60 countries, employs approximately 1,000 people, and has a consolidated network of more than 40 international partners. For more information, visit antaresvision.com and antaresvisiongroup.com.

About rfxcel

Part of Antares Vision Group, rfxcel has a long history of providing leading-edge software solutions to help companies build and manage their digital supply chain, lower costs, protect their products and brand reputations, and engage consumers. Blue-chip organizations in the life sciences (pharmaceuticals and medical devices), food and beverage, worldwide government, and consumer goods industries trust rfxcel’s Traceability System to power end-to-end supply chain solutions in track and trace, environmental monitoring, regulatory compliance, serialization, and visibility. Founded in 2003, the company is headquartered in the United States.

Uzbekistan ASL BELGISI Update: Deadline for Pharma Serialization Extended

On February 7, 2022 — just 10 days after we posted our Uzbekistan ASL BELGISI update — the country’s State Tax Committee announced that it was “extending the timeframe for the phased introduction of mandatory digital markings” of pharmaceutical products.

The requirements were originally scheduled to take effect on February 1.

The extension was announced in a letter signed by Mubin Mirzaev, the first deputy chairman of the State Tax Committee. A new deadline was not stipulated, so the country’s serialization scheme for pharmaceuticals is effectively on hold until further notice. The letter did not mention 2022 deadlines for other regulated product categories (e.g., tobacco products; alcohol, including wine and wine products; beer and brewing products; appliances; and water and soft drinks).

Delay or not, we expect the serialization and labeling requirements, which are based on Russia’s Chestny ZNAK system, to remain the same. Read our Uzbekistan ASL BELGISI update for more details about the regulations.

More provisions for Uzbekistan ASL BELGISI from the State Tax Committee

Deputy Chairman Mirzaev’s letter outlined two provisions:

      • A provision to instruct the State Tax Committee and CRPT Turon, which operates Uzbekistan ASL BELGISI, to submit proposals to the country’s Cabinet of Ministers for a system to recognize marking codes from other countries, “primarily markings applied [in] the territory of the Russian Federation.”
      • A provision to “implement a mechanism for electronic registration of non-resident foreign manufacturers of pharmaceutical products with the tax authorities.” Manufacturers would be assigned a non-resident taxpayer identification number (TIN) and would have to obtain a non-resident electronic digital signature (EDS).

The letter also said that the “norms for amending the Technical Regulations for the production of pharmaceutical products were transferred from the project for labeling ‘household appliances’ to the project for mandatory digital labeling of pharmaceutical products.”

As we wrote in our Uzbekistan ASL BELGISI update, a pilot for appliances began on July 1, 2021, and mandatory labeling is being introduced in phases. Vacuum cleaners, refrigerators, freezers, washing machines, TVs, and monitors were required to be labeled beginning December 1, 2021.

Final thoughts

The Uzbekistan ASL BELGISI delay illustrates a truth about supply chain regulations: Deadlines change. All the time. Announcements like the one we talked about today should never come as a surprise or catch you off guard.

The good news is that deadline changes are not the end of the world. What’s important is for you to have a supply chain solution that meets established standards, such as the world-leading GS1 standard. If your solution is fast, flexible, scalable, and automated — like our Traceability System — you will be ready to comply and keep your supply chain moving. All the time.

We’ll continue to monitor Uzbekistan ASL BELGISI as we do with other supply chain regulations. In just the last two weeks or so, we’ve written about the Africa supply chain (first of a two-part series), Egypt’s pharmaceutical regulations, Russia Chestny ZNAK requirements for beer and dietary supplements, the United Arab Emirates’ “Tatmeen” platform, and the U.S. Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA). Count on us to keep you informed about regulations around the world.

And contact us if you have any questions or want to see our solutions in action. Our digital supply chain experts are always here to listen to you, help you evaluate your needs, and work directly with you to design a solution customized for your business.

Understanding the Africa Supply Chain, Part 1

Supply chains are about people. Yes, technology — like the digital solutions we provide — and regulations are important, but people are the true drivers, the alpha and omega. People design supply chains and make them run (efficiently and legally, we all hope). As consumers, people are the final destination of every supply chain; if you don’t understand their needs, wants, and habits, and if your products cannot reach them reliably, you’re out of business. The Africa supply chain is no exception.

In Part 1 of our series about the Africa supply chain, we’re looking at facts and figures about the almost 1.4 billion people on the continent. By understanding the people — where they live, their economies and how they work, and ambitious initiatives that will affect their daily lives — we provide the context for a broader discussion and understanding of the Africa supply chain. Let’s get started.

Africa by the numbers

Geography and population

Africa is big. It’s about 11.7 million square miles (30.3 million square km) total, and about 5,000 miles (8,000 km) from north to south and 4,600 miles (7,400 km) from east to west. Only Asia is bigger: 17.2 million square miles (almost 44.6 million square km).

There are 54 countries in Africa. As we said above, the population is approximately 1.4 billion — that’s about 17 percent of the world population. For comparison, there are roughly 4.6 billion people in Asia, 748 million in Europe, 654 million in Latin America and the Caribbean, 370 million in North America, and 42.5 million in Oceana. Africa is also the youngest continent in the world: The median age is 19.7 years. According to the World Bank, half of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa will be under 25 by 2050.

Africa has the highest growth rate in the world, and its population has increased every year since 2000, when it was approximately 811 million. By 2100, the population will approach parity with Asia. Nigeria is the most populous country, with 206 million people, followed by Ethiopia, which has 115 million. Egypt ranks third — 102 million people — and is the most populous country in in North Africa. (Be sure to read our overview of the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain to learn about what’s happening there.)

The continent is home to between 1,500 and 2,000 languages, about one-third of the world’s languages. At least 75 of those have more than 1 million speakers.

Urbanization

Africa has led the world in urbanization this decade. As of 2021, 609 million people lived in urban areas; this could reach 722 million by 2026. According to the Population Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 22 cities in Africa are expected to grow at an average annual rate of more than 5 percent in the first half of the 2020s, and 58 are expected to grow at 4-5 percent. The two fastest-growing cities in the world are Gwagwalada, Nigeria, and Kabinda, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Cities in Angola, Tanzania, and Mozambique are topping current growth statistics, and by 2035, Africa’s fastest-growing cities are forecasted to be Bujumbura, Burundi, and Zinder, Nigeria.

Proliferation of mobile technology

According to the GSMA, an association representing mobile network operators around the world, 495 million people — 46 percent of the population — were subscribed to mobile services in Sub-Saharan Africa at the end of 2020. This was an increase of almost 20 million over 2019. By 2025, adoption of 4G will double to 28 percent (the global average is 57 percent), and 5G will reach 3 percent of total mobile connections.

GSMA reports that 40 percent of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa is under the age of 15. Overall, Africa’s very young population will drive mobile use. Importantly, we can also assume that this demographic will use their mobile devices for everything from banking and shopping to entertainment, creating opportunities for companies to connect to consumers and involve them in the Africa supply chain.

Economy

Pre-pandemic, United Nations statistical data showed that Africa’s economy grew by about 3.4 percent in 2019, “creating one of the longest stretches of uninterrupted positive economic expansion in [the continent’s] history.” This helped fuel a growth of the middle class year over year.

In 2020, Africa experienced a 3.4 percent contraction in gross domestic product (GDP).

According to the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Industrial Development Report 2022: The Future of Industrialization in a Post-Pandemic World, the pandemic has caused considerable output loss in Africa, as it has in most of world. Here are projected output losses by 2021 for the “economy groups” in Africa:

    • North Africa (four economies): 7.3 percent
    • Less-developed countries (14 economies): 6.8 percent
    • Sub-Saharan Africa (12 economies): 6.4 percent

For perspective, estimated output losses were 7.5 percent in West Asia (5 economies), 4.1 percent in Northern and Western Europe (4 economies), 2.7 percent in North America and Pacific (4 economies), 10.3 percent in less-developed countries in Asia, and 1.4 percent in China.

According to a quick online survey of Africa-based websites, the top job sectors on the continent are agriculture, which accounts for 15 percent of GDP; infrastructure; mining; service; banking and finance; information and communications technology; entrepreneurship; entertainment; and tourism. See here and here for more information.

In 2020, 453 million people were employed in Africa, with the majority in Eastern Africa. The two most populous countries, Nigeria and Ethiopia, had the highest working populations, about 56.6 million and 51.3 million, respectively.

According to the World Bank, regional growth in Africa projections look like this:

    • Sub-Saharan Africa: Growth for 2022 and 2023 will remain just below 4 percent.
    • East and Southern Africa: Growth of 3.4 percent in 2022; excluding Angola and South Africa, 4.3 percent growth is expected in 2022.
    • West and Central Africa: Growth of 5.3 percent in 2022; the West African Economic and Monetary Union (Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte D’Ivoire, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Niger, Senegal, and Togo) is projected to grow at 6.1 percent in 2022. Nigeria is expected to grow by 2.9 percent (African Development Bank Group).

Agenda 2063 and the Africa Supply Chain

Agenda 2063 “is Africa’s blueprint and master plan for transforming Africa into the global powerhouse of the future.” It is being implemented through five 10-year plans, the first of which is scheduled to end next year. Many of its Flagship Projects relate to modernizing and expanding infrastructure; therefore, they are directly related to the Africa supply chain. For example:

African High-Speed Train Network: The network will connect all countries’ capitals and commercial centers, including connecting the 16 landlocked countries to major seaports and neighboring countries.

Single African Air-Transport Market (SAATM): The goal is “the full liberalization of intra-African air transport services in terms of market access [and] traffic rights for scheduled and freight air services by eligible airlines, thereby improving air services connectivity and air carrier efficiencies.”

Continental Commodities Strategy: The goal is to move Africa away from being a raw materials supplier to “developing [its] commodities as a driver for achieving the structural, social, and economic transformation of the continent.” Integrating into regional and global value chains is a key part of the strategy.

The African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA): The goal is to accelerate intra-African trade and boost Africa’s “trading position in the global market by strengthening [its] common voice and policy space in global trade negotiations.” Thirty-six countries had ratified the AfCFTA agreement as of February 5, 2021.

Final thoughts

To understand your supply chain, you have to understand people. We hope this overview of Africa was informative, showing where people live, how they work, the continent-wide trends, and what’s being done to ensure the Africa supply chain better serves every person in all 54 countries.

Everything we’ve talked about today influences the Africa supply chain; however, urbanization could be the most telling and important. As cities continue to grow — remember, urban populations are projected to reach 722 million by 2026 — people will demand more access to goods and services, and the supply chain will have to respond nimbly and efficiently. The proliferation of mobile devices and networks, especially among young people, is another important driver.

rfxcel understands supply chains. The technology, the regulations, and how they affect people. Move on to Part II of our Africa supply chain series, where we discuss recent developments and regulations in specific countries. And be sure to contact us if you have any questions or want a short demonstration of our solutions. We’d love to hear from you.

Last but not least, take a look at our other news from the Africa and Middle East region:

Egypt Pharmaceutical Supply Chain: News and Regulations

If you follow our blog (and we know you do), you’ve probably detected a theme over the last few days: global pharma compliance. We’ve written about Russia Chestny ZNAK, United Arab Emirates Tatmeen, Uzbekistan ASL BELGISI, and our rfxcel DSCSA Compliance Library. Today, we’re looking at the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain. Let’s get started.

Notable news about the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain

Last August, Egyptian Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouli told a gathering of government officials that the country would prioritize the “localization” of the pharma industry. He said President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi had tasked the government with developing an executive plan to this end.

It seems to be working: the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain is enjoying strong growth. Last month, Egyptian Drug Authority (EDA) Director Dr. Tamer Essam said the country’s pharma exports had risen to 35 percent, an all-time high. “There is no medicine in the world or vaccine that is not manufactured in Egypt,” he said. In February 2021, the EDA announced it was launching an export subsidy initiative and had begun reviewing and updating all export procedures to ensure they complied with global regulatory requirements.

In April 2021, the head of the General Division of Drug Traders at the Federation of Egyptian Chambers of Commerce (FEDCOC), Ali Auf, said Egypt produced about 85 percent of its pharmaceutical needs domestically (and imported only 15 percent).

Auf made these statements two days after President Sisi inaugurated Gypto Pharma City, which embodies Egypt’s drive for pharmaceutical self-sufficiency. Situated on roughly 44.5 acres in Khanka, about 20 miles from Cairo, it’s one of the largest “medicine cities” in the region. It has facilities for production, administration, industrial services, and networks.

Egypt envisions Gypto Pharma City as a regional hub for the international pharmaceutical and vaccine industries, calling it “one of the most important national projects … with the aim of possessing the modern technological and industrial capacity in this vital field.”

The Egyptian Pharmaceutical Track & Trace System

The goal of the Egyptian Pharmaceutical Track & Trace System (EPTTS) is end-to-end traceability and product authentication across the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain to reduce counterfeits, increase efficiency, and protect consumers. Appropriately, this dovetails into what the government has said about Gypto Pharma City — that it will “help citizens obtain high-quality and safe pharmacological treatment, end monopolistic practices, and control the prices of medicines.”

At first, the Ministry of Health and Population managed EPTTS; however, Law No. 151 of August 2019 essentially transferred those duties to the newly formed EDA. (It also created another organization, the Egyptian Authority for Unified Drug Procurement, a “centralized procurement and supply interface.”) The EDA was initially affiliated to the prime minister, but Presidential Decree 18/2020 of January 2020 gave it more autonomy.

The EDA “inherited” three organizations from the Ministry of Health and Population:

    • The Central Administration of Pharmaceutical Affairs (CAPA) registers pharma products, issues licenses for the establishment of pharma entities, and licenses the import and export of pharma products. It’s also responsible for regulating prices and evaluating clinical trials and studies of drugs.
    • The National Organization for Drug Control and Research (NODCAR) works to ensure the quality, safety, and effectiveness of pharma products, cosmetics, and insecticides. NODCAR must certify every pharmaceutical product before it can be registered, marketed, advertised, distributed, imported, or exported.
    • The National Organization for Research and Control of Biologicals (NORCB) monitors, inspects, and releases all biological products for human or animal use, such as vaccines.

Like most countries, the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain follows GS1 labeling standards, characterized by Global Trade Item Numbers (GTINs), Serialized Global Trade Item Numbers (SGTINs), 2D DataMatrix codes, GS1-128 barcodes, serial shipping container codes (SSCCs), and Global Location Numbers (GLNs). It is also using GS1’s Electronic Product Code Information Services (EPCIS) standard.

Secondary packaging must be marked with a 2D DataMatrix code with the GTIN, expiry date, batch number, and a randomized serial number. EPTTS’ original plan was to require these data points to be presented in a specific sequence, but this was nixed. Cases and pallets must have a GS1-128 barcode or a DataMatrix code with the SSCC.

EPTTS requires aggregation, including maintaining the parent-child relationship, but has yet to provide details. We’re also waiting for specifics about some aspects of serialization, including if serial numbers can be reused.

For data and compliance reporting, supply chain actors are required to submit data to a GS1 Global Data Synchronization Network (GDSN) database. They must upload photos — as many as six of them — that clearly show the product packaging and other details, including the GTIN, brand name, storage instructions, country of origin, product name, and any warning statement. To date, however, the government hasn’t published specifications for communicating with the EPTTS database.

A pilot to test EPTTS was held from December 1, 2019, to January 12, 2020. Participants have shared feedback, but there hasn’t been much movement since. GS1 Egypt and the EDA are apparently still working on the implementation guidelines, which are now in their third iteration.

Final thoughts

The Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain regulations are a work in progress, and we’ll continue to follow developments and share updates when there’s concrete news.

But as we said in our overview of UAE Tatmeen, the global push for pharmaceutical traceability and serialization is continuing at a furious pace. If you’re a manufacturer, a distributor, a third-party logistics provider, a dispenser — any actor in the supply chain — waiting for Egypt or any other country to formalize their regulations is not a wise strategy. You have to have a solution now, preferably one that will work in every country.

That’s what our Traceability System does. Our supply chain experts can demonstrate in a few minutes how it automates compliance and optimizes just about every other aspect of your operations. Contact us today to see it in action. And continue following our blog. We’ll be writing more about global pharma regulations in the coming weeks (and months and years).  For example:

Russia Serialization Update: Chestny ZNAK Beer and Dietary Supplements Pilots Ending This Summer

We’re always keeping an eye on Russia’s National Track and Trace Digital System, known as Chestny ZNAK. Right now, there are two things to keep on your radar for 2022: the pilots for Chestny ZNAK beer and dietary supplements, both of which are scheduled to wrap up in August. Here’s a quick recap.

The Chestny ZNAK beer and dietary supplements pilots

Russia’s Ministry of Industry and Trade announced the Chestny ZNAK beer pilot in October 2020. It began on April 1, 2021, and was originally scheduled to end on February 28, 2022 — a little more than two weeks from the time we’re writing this. The pilot, or “experiment” as these test runs are called in Russia, also involves “beer-based beverages.”  It’s testing labeling for beer, beer drinks, and low-alcohol drinks that are not required to be labeled with federal special and excise stamps.

The pilot for dietary supplements began on May 1, 2021, and was originally scheduled to end on March 1, 2022. The Center for Research in Perspective Technologies (CRPT), which operates Chestny ZNAK, has not said much more than this. One thing to note, though, is that Chestny ZNAK has also referred to this product category as “biologically active food additives.”

At present, the Chestny ZNAK beer and dietary supplement pilots are slated to end on August 21, about five-and-a-half months from now. If you want to sell these products in the lucrative Russian market, you need to start thinking about compliance. If the CRPT follows its established protocol, there will be pilot reports and evaluations, then the regulations will go into full effect.

It’s worth noting here that two other pilots have ended, but the CRPT hasn’t issued further guidance and they are still shown as “experiments” on the Chestny ZNAK website:

    • Bicycles: A seven-month pilot ended on May 31, 2020.
    • Wheelchairs: A pilot for hand-powered wheelchairs ran from September 1, 2019, to December 1, 2020. Another pilot for wheelchairs with an electric engine or other mechanical means for locomotion ran from December 1, 2020, to June 1, 2021.

Chestny ZNAK beer and dietary supplements requirements

We got into the details of the Chestny ZNAK beer and dietary supplements pilots when they were announced in early 2021. Take a look at those articles for in-depth information, including the specific products that are being tested and that will, we assume, be regulated alongside all the other industries: bicycles, bottled drinking water, dairy, footwear, fur, light industry, medications, perfumes, photo cameras and flash bulbs, tires, tobacco, and wheelchairs.

Serialization, aggregation, unit- and batch-level traceability, crypto codes, and electronic reporting and records management are the hallmarks of Chestny ZNAK. Beer and dietary supplements, like products in other categories, must be labeled with a 2D DataMatrix code encoded with the following:

    • A 14-digit Global Trade Item Number (GTIN)
    • A 13-digit serial number generated by the CRPT or the economic agent
    • A 4-digit verification key from the CRPT
    • A 44-digit verification code (i.e., crypto code) from the CRPT

Final thoughts

The Chestny ZNAK beer and dietary supplements pilots are part of Russia’s ongoing effort to serialize its entire supply chain by 2024. And as our General Director of Operations in Russia Victoria Kozlova noted in World Pharma Today, the system was designed “to guarantee the authenticity and declared quality of goods being purchased by customers.”

rfxcel has been prepared for these regulations since 2018, and we’ve established ourselves as the leader in Chestny ZNAK compliance. For example:

So, if you’re looking to do business in Russia — or even if you’re already working with another provider — contact us today. Also download our Chestny ZNAK white paper and read some of our other articles about the regulations:

 

 

 

 

 

UAE Pharmaceutical Products Traceability Requirements for 2022: “Tatmeen” Platform

The global push for pharmaceutical traceability and serialization continues at a furious pace. Today, we’re looking at the United Arab Emirates (UAE), whose Ministry of Health and Prevention (MOHAP) in June 2021 announced the “Tatmeen” platform for UAE pharmaceutical products traceability. There are key deadlines this year, so let’s take a look.

UAE Pharmaceutical Products Traceability and the Tatmeen System

MOHAP established Tatmeen, which means “assurance” in Arabic, in Ministerial Decree No. 73 on June 14, 2021. Described as a “central command center,” it’s a GS1-based platform for UAE pharmaceutical products traceability. MOHAP’s partners include the Dubai Health Authority (DHA), Department of Health (Abu Dhabi), and EVOTEQ, a “digital transformation catalyst” based in the UAE, and GS1 UAE.

Tatmeen’s goals should sound familiar:

    • Fight counterfeits and illegal and substandard medications
    • Eliminate unauthorized imports
    • Improve recall management
    • Ensure expired and about-to-expire drugs don’t reach consumers
    • Forecast demand and avoid shortages
    • Move drugs where they’re needed quickly and safely
    • Protect pharma companies, including their intellectual property rights

These other aspects should also sound familiar:

    • Products are scanned at every node of the supply chain
    • Product information is reported into to a central repository (in this case GS1’s BrandSync platform)
    • Scanning captures and verifies data in real time and reports information into a central database
    • Hospitals and pharmacies scan when drugs arrive at their facility and when they’re dispensed
    • Patients and consumers can scan with mobile devices to validate products, report expired products, fakes, and suspected gray market activity

Tatmeen will integrate with the DHA’s electronic medical record system, Salama (incorrectly identified as “Salam” in some industry sources). It will also utilize DHA’s Tarmeez, a paperless drug and medical supplies management system that gives authorized users access to a centralized electronic catalog of all available inventory.

Tatmeen labeling and reporting requirements

All conventional medicines sold, distributed, or stored in the UAE are regulated and must be serialized. These products are exempt:

    • Free samples
    • Products imported for personal use only
    • Medical devices and supplies
    • General sales list (GSL) products

And —surprise, surprise — UAE pharmaceutical products traceability requirements should sound familiar. Secondary packaging must contain four data points in a GS1 DataMatrix code and in human-readable form:

    1. Global Trade Item Number (GTIN)
    2. Randomized serial number (up to 20 characters)
    3. Expiry date (in YYMMDD format)
    4. Batch or lot number

This example is adapted from the MOHAP’s serialization guide:

UAE DataMatrix Code

Aggregation requirements should also ring a bell: All logistic units must be aggregated and labeled with a GS1-128 barcode encoded with a serial shipping container code (SSCC). Manufacturers are responsible for aggregation.

If a brand owner regards an item as a trade item, “it may additionally be identified with a GTIN.” Distributors, wholesalers, and health facilities that unpack and re-pack products to deliver to points of dispensing are required to aggregate the logistic units using their own SSCC codes.

Marketing authorization holders (MAHs), brand owners, manufacturers, or their subsidiaries must register and upload the mandated product master data into the BrandSync platform.

Domestic and foreign manufacturers, third-party logistics providers, batch releasers, contract manufacturing organizations, distributors, licensing agents, and MAHs are responsible for collecting serialized product item traceability records and reporting them to Tatmeen.

UAE pharmaceutical products traceability rollout and 2022 deadline

There was a 6-month “status adjustment” period after Tatmeen was announced for manufacturers and marketing authorization holders to register with the BrandSync platform and begin using 2D DataMatrix codes. This deadline passed on December 13, 2021.

The next major deadline is December 13, 2022. By that date, all supply chain actors in the UAE must obtain a Global Location Number (GLN) from GS1 UAE to identify their organization, where it’s located, and other required information. Relevant stakeholders must also begin reporting serial numbers to Tatmeen and begin aggregation with GS1-128 barcodes and SSCCs.

Final thoughts

We noted a few times that parts of the Tatmeen regulations should sound familiar. If you follow our blog and read our articles about pharmaceutical regulations in other countries — DSCSA in the United States, Chestny ZNAK in Russia, ANVISA in Brazil, ASL BELGISI in Uzbekistan, and so on — everything about UAE pharmaceutical products traceability should ring a bell.

As we said right at the start today, the global push for pharmaceutical traceability and serialization continues at a furious pace. Requirements may vary from country to country, but their essence is the same (e.g., protecting consumers, serialization, traceability, electronic reporting, central repositories, GS1 standards). Tatmeen is just one more example in a very large regulatory ocean.

It’s easy to feel swept up in this current. And, truth be told, if you’re not complying now or preparing to comply by published deadlines, you’re putting your business in jeopardy. If you have questions about Tatmeen or complying with pharmaceutical serialization and traceability regulations in any country, contact us today. In just a few minutes, our supply chain specialists can demonstrate how our award-winning Traceability System ensures you’re compliant in any country, today, tomorrow — always.

For even more information, check out our Global Compliance Page, download our Worldwide Pharmaceutical Compliance Requirements white paper, and catch up on other pharma news in our blog:

rfxcel DSCSA Compliance Library: Our DSCSA Resources in One Place

Welcome to the rfxcel DSCSA Compliance Library. It’s a collection of our DSCSA resources (as of September 2022). As we move toward the November 2023 deadline, we thought it would be a good idea to make this information available in one convenient location.

We will, of course, continue writing about the DSCSA and providing the best supply chain solutions to ensure manufacturers, wholesalers, dispensers, repackagers, third-party logistics providers — all pharmaceutical stakeholders — meet the requirements and remain compliant forever.

So bookmark this page and our blog. You can also subscribe to our newsletter to make sure you don’t miss anything about the DSCSA and other important developments in the pharma industry. Just fill out the short form at the bottom of any page on our website.

And of course, contact us today with your questions about the DSCSA or anything else about the pharma supply chain. Our experts are here to help.

A note about the rfxcel DSCSA Compliance Library

Please note that that we haven’t included everything we’ve written or presented about the DSCSA. Deadlines and requirements have changed since the law was enacted in November 2013, so some of our earlier pieces are, logically, outdated. Rest assured that the contents of the rfxcel DSCSA Compliance Library are up to date.

If you want to see how we’ve followed the evolution of the DSCSA in our blog or track down other news we shared over the years, look around our “Resources” page. You’ll probably find some other things that interest you too.

­­Our top DSCSA webinars
The DSCSA in our blog
DSCSA compliance white papers + global compliance resources
Our top DSCSA news items
The DSCSA timeline

DSCSA 2023 Serialization Timeline