rfxadmin, Author at rfxcel.com
EnglishFrenchGermanItalianPortugueseRussianSpanish

For a Leading Berry Producer, Antares Vision Group Digitalizes Billions of Products for Tight Supply Chain Oversight and Direct Consumer Connections

The Group’s Supply Chain Transparency solution serializes packages in the field, enabling the use of unit-level data to help ensure customers are satisfied with product quality.

Travagliato (Brescia), January 17, 2023 – Antares Vision Group (EXM, AV:IM), an Italian multinational and a leading provider of track and trace and quality control systems that ensures the transparency of products and supply chains through integrated data management, has successfully piloted a Supply Chain Transparency solution for a prominent berry company. The project entails the digitalization of over 1.5 billion products, empowering the berry producer to protect, support, and communicate with its customers.

Powered by technology from rfxcel, which is part of Antares Vision Group, the Supply Chain Transparency solution package enables data concerning harvested berries to be collected and integrated into a platform that fully controls product safety and quality.

Using Antares Vision Group’s advanced serialization and mobile traceability technologies, the producer scans each individual clamshell to associate berry type, farm, and growing conditions, giving each package a unique digital identity with detailed product information. Consumers can scan an on-package QR Code to take a survey, giving the producer valuable insight into its customers’ impressions of specific berries grown at specific locations. This allows the company to focus on the types of berries consumers like best, and to ensure product quality is maintained at high standards from field to end user.

Glenn Abood, CEO of rfxcel, said the project showcases the technology’s impact and scalability. “We’re really expanding boundaries with this project,” he said. “Our coordination with the berry producer has been greatly rewarding; together, we’ve designed a system that reliably manages billions of products in the first and last mile of the supply chain. It performs these tasks day in and day out, with sub-second scanning times and exacting accuracy.”

Abood added that Antares Vision Group and the producer had discussed other applications for the wide-scale serialization of products, such as using digitalized unit-level data for consumer engagement activities and risk-mitigation strategies.

Abood continued: “Our serialization technologies are opening up entirely new avenues for brand value and benefits, connecting safety, quality, efficiency, and trust. The brand owners have actionable and granular information about consumer preferences, opening new dialogue channels and highly targeted customer interactions. Recall management is another benefit: It’s not necessary to recall every package, only a single clamshell. These advantages are available only with serialized products, which unlock opportunities with the power of unit-level data.”

For further information

Herb Wong, Senior Vice President, Product and Strategy: +1 925 791 3235 / hwong@rfxcel.com

Alessandro Baj Badino, Head of Investor Relations: +39 030 72 83 500 / investors@antaresvision.com

Davide Antonioli, Investor Relator: +39 030 7283500 / investors@antaresvision.com

Federica Menichino, Axelcomm (Press Contact): +39 3496976982 / federica.menichino@axel-comm.it

 

ABOUT ANTARES VISION GROUP

Antares Vision Group is an outstanding technology partner in digitalization and innovation for companies and institutions, guaranteeing the safety of products and people, business competitiveness, and environmental protection. The Group provides a unique and comprehensive ecosystem of technologies to guarantee product quality (inspection systems and equipment) and end-to-end product traceability (from raw materials to production, from distribution to the consumer) through integrated data management, applying artificial intelligence and blockchain technology. Antares Vision Group is active in life science (pharmaceutical, biomedical devices and hospitals) and Fast-Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG), including food, beverage, cosmetics, and glass and metal containers. As a world leader in track and trace solutions for pharmaceutical products, the Group provides major global manufacturers (over 50% of the top 20 multinationals) and numerous government authorities with solutions, monitoring their supply chains and validating product authenticity. Listed since April 2019 on the Italian Stock Exchange in the Alternative Investment Market (AIM) segment and from 14 May 2021 in the STAR segment of the Mercato Telematico Azionario (MTA), Antares Vision Group recorded a turnover of €179 million in 2021, operates in 60 countries, employs more than 1,000 people, and has a consolidated network of over 40 international partners. To learn more, please visit www.antaresvision.com and www.antaresvisiongroup.com.

rfxcel Is Now Antares Vision Group Supply Chain Visibility Solutions

The company will enhance supply chain transparency in diverse industries by leveraging its proven technologies and Antares Vision Group’s unique ecosystem of L1-L5 solutions.

Reno, Nevada, December 1, 2022 rfxcel today announced that it is now Antares Vision Group Supply Chain Visibility Solutions. The company will continue as a leader in digital supply chain solutions while being bolstered by other Group members and their expanding global presence.

Glenn Abood, who co-founded rfxcel in 2003, will continue as CEO and is a part of the Group’s Governing Board. He said there will be no internal organizational changes, and that customer operations and support will continue as before.

“The main message, other than excitement about the evolution of our company, is one of continuity,” he said. “Continuity in every facet of our work, but with one significant difference: We have the full force of Antares Vision Group’s unique ecosystem of L1-L5 solutions. This means more options, flexibility, and possibilities for our customers. It means more technologies and capabilities in more industries and countries. It also means that Antares Vision Group is the undisputed leader in end-to-end supply chain solutions.”

rfxcel entered into an acquisition agreement with the Group in February 2021. As Antares Vision Group Supply Chain Visibility Solutions, it will continue bringing excellence and best-in-class solutions to diverse industries, including life sciences, food, beverage, cosmetics, and fast-moving consumer goods. For more information, contact Senior Communications and Content Manager Garrison Spik at garrison@rfxcel.com.

***

About Antares Vision Group

Antares Vision Group is an outstanding technology partner in digitalization and innovation for enterprises and institutions, guaranteeing the safety of products and people, business competitiveness, and environmental protection.

The Group provides a unique and comprehensive ecosystem of technologies — including software and hardware — to guarantee product quality (inspection systems and equipment) and end-to-end traceability (from raw materials to production, from distribution to the consumer), through integrated data management, applying artificial intelligence and blockchain too.

Antares Vision Group is active in the life sciences (pharmaceuticals, biomedical devices, and hospitals), beverage, food, and cosmetics industries, and is expanding into other sectors. The world leader in track and trace systems for pharmaceutical products, it provides major global manufacturers and numerous government authorities with solutions to monitor their supply chains and validate product authenticity.

Listed since April 2019 on the Italian Stock Exchange in the Alternative Investment Market (AIM) segment and from May 2021 in the STAR segment of the Mercato Telematico Azionario (MTA) (electronic equity market), Antares Vision Group operates in 60 countries, employs approximately 1,000 people, and has a consolidated network of more than 40 international partners. antaresvisiongroup.com

About Antares Vision Group Supply Chain Visibility Solutions

Antares Vision Group Supply Chain Visibility Solutions has a long history of providing leading-edge software solutions to help companies build and manage their digital supply chain, lower costs, protect their products and brand reputations, and engage consumers. Blue-chip organizations in the life sciences (pharmaceuticals and medical devices), food and beverage, worldwide government, and consumer goods industries trust the company’s technology to power end-to-end supply chain solutions in track and trace, transparency, environmental monitoring, regulatory compliance, serialization, and visibility. Founded in 2003, the company is headquartered in the United States.

India Track and Trace Requirements Update: APIs, iVEDA, and Barcoding

It’s been a busy year with India track and trace requirements. The Ministry of Health has extended a deadline, announced a new deadline, and released new draft rules concerning key areas of the country’s pharmaceutical regulations.

There are deadlines coming up in the next 6 months, so let’s take a look at what’s happening with these India track and trace requirements..

India track and trace requirements for 2023

The upcoming India track and trace requirements affect three areas of manufacturing: labeling active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), reporting, and product labeling for the Top 300 brands. We’ll go in chronological order:

Labeling APIs: January 2023 deadline

Starting January 1, 2023, all imported and domestically manufactured APIs must be labeled with QR codes “at each level packaging that store data or information.” The government says this will help combat falsified drugs.

This is the culmination of a process that began in June 2019, when the Drugs Technical Advisory Board (DTAB) approved a proposal mandating QR codes on APIs. At that time, DTAB estimated that the regulation would affect approximately 2,500 APIs.

The QR codes must contain 11 data points:

      1. Unique product identification code
      2. Name of the API
      3. Brand name (if any)
      4. Name and address of the manufacturer
      5. Batch number
      6. Batch size
      7. Date of manufacturing
      8. Date of expiry or retesting
      9. Serial shipping container code
      10. Manufacturing license number or import license number
      11. Special storage conditions required (if any)

QR codes will also link to a national database with pricing data from the National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority.

Companies are required to get a GS1 Company Prefix, a unique number that identifies a company as the owner a barcode and the product to which it’s affixed, and a GS1 Global Location Number. GS1 Global Trade Item Numbers will serve as the “unique identification code.”

Reporting to the iVEDA Portal: March 2023 deadline

On April 4, 2022, the Directorate General of Foreign Trade (DGFT) released a public notice that extended to March 31, 2023, the deadline for export reporting to the Integrated Validation of Exports of Drugs from India and its Authentication (iVEDA) portal. The change applies to both small-scale industry (SSI)- and non-SSI-manufactured drugs.

The deadline for this requirement has been postponed at least four times, starting in 2018, when India track and trace requirements centered around another reporting portal, the Drugs Authentication and Verification Application (DAVA). As we reported when iVEDA was launched, the deadline was changed from April 1, 2020, to October 1, 2020. It was changed again in April 2021 and, as we’re discussing now, in April 2022.

Draft regulations for barcoding pharma products: May 2023 deadline

On September 5, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare published draft guidelines for barcoding the Top 300 brands in the country, all of which are named in “Schedule H2” of the announcement. The rules will come into force on May 1, 2023.

The goal of these India track and trace requirements — like so many other regulations around the world — is to combat counterfeiting, diversion, and unauthorized sales. The rules stipulate that eight data points must be incorporated into a “Bar Code or Quick Response Code” to be printed on or affixed to the primary packaging:

      • Unique product identification code (e.g., GTIN)
      • Proper and generic drug name
      • Brand name
      • Batch number
      • Expire date
      • Manufacturer name and address
      • Manufacture date
      • Manufacturing license number

If there is “inadequate space in primary package label,” the codes must be placed on the secondary packaging.

Industry observers have noted concerns with the guidelines, including:

      • QR codes may not be practical for data-dense pharmaceutical labeling.
      • The guidelines may not actually help fight counterfeits, diversion, and unauthorized sales.
      • In order for the eight mandated data points to be readable, labels would have to be unrealistically large — too big to fit on most packages.
      • It’s not clear if 2D DataMatrix codes would meet the requirements for a “Bar Code” in the guidelines.
      • GS1 standards are not required; in fact, they’re not mentioned at all.

To this last point, the initial response seems to point toward a call for GS1 standards: DataMatrix for barcoding, GTINs to identify products, use of two-digit Authentication Identifiers.

Final thoughts

India track and trace requirements are obviously evolving. Expect more changes as the deadlines for APIs, iVEDA reporting, and barcoding get nearer.

But one thing won’t change: India will continue to cultivate its position in the global pharmaceutical industry. Consider these statistics from its Department of Pharmaceuticals 2020-21 Annual Report:

      • The Indian pharmaceutical industry is the world’s third largest by volume and 14th largest in terms of value.
      • It has the second-most FDA-approved plants for generic drug manufacturing outside the United States.
      • It accounts for 60% of global vaccine production.
      • It is the world’s third-largest API market (8% share of global API industry, 500+ APIs manufactured in India, and it contributes 57% of APIs on the World Health Organization’s Prequalified List of APIs).

Our team has worked in the India pharma market for many years and understand its complexities, challenges, and benefits. We have offices and experienced staff in the country. And our signature Traceability System and Compliance Management solution have helped our customers keep up with India track and trace requirements and remain competitive.

Contact us today to lean more about the India track and trace requirements and to arrange a demo. In about 15 minutes, one of our supply chain experts can show you how we can maximize your impact in India.

Join Antares Vision Group at the HDA 2022 Traceability Seminar in October

Antares Vision Group will be at the HDA 2022 Traceability Seminar October 12-14 at the Marriott Marquis in Washington, D.C. We’re an official sponsor, and our team will be there with our latest technologies and solutions. Stop by to meet us!

The HDA 2022 Traceability Seminar brings together healthcare supply chain leaders to learn more about implementation milestones of the DSCSA as distributors, manufacturers, and dispensers implement serialization and traceability technologies.

Attendees also discuss innovative approaches and lessons learned from the first 9 years of the DSCSA rollout and what to expect during the “last mile” of implementation until the November 2023 deadline.

Get the latest DSCSA intel from our experts at the HDA 2022 Traceability Seminar

If you’re reading this, chances are you know that we’ve been leading on the DSCSA since Day 1 and have collaborated with the pharma industry to test key systems, work out kinks, and help all stakeholders prepare. Here are just a few examples:

And it should come as no surprise that Herb Wong, our SVP of product and strategy, will be at the Seminar. He’ll be at our booth, of course, but he’s also doing the “EPCIS Onboarding Across the Supply Chain” panel discussion on Thursday, Oct. 13, from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.

Herb will also host a Friday morning roundtable about DSCSA readiness. Antares Vision Group is sponsoring the day’s Roundtable Discussions (9:35-10:50 a.m.), where you can discuss operational issues associated with traceability implementation. Choose a topic that interests you and rotate through the tables with your peers. Highlights from the discussions will be shared at the end of the session.

With this experience and knowledge, our team wants to answer your questions and show you our solutions while you’re at the Seminar. No matter how far along you are in your DSCSA preparations, time with our team will be time well spent — informative, interesting, and maybe even game-changing.

Final thoughts

We’re just a year away from the final DSCSA deadline and the full serialization of the U.S. pharmaceutical supply chain. The HDA 2022 Traceability Seminar is really the place to be when it comes to the “right now” of the DSCSA for product identification, product tracing, product verification, and requirements for authorized trading partners.

So bring your DSCSA questions for our team and let us know how things are going. Visit our booth. Sit in on Herb’s Thursday EPCIS panel discussion and his Friday roundtable. If you have 3 minutes, take our DSCSA Readiness Survey. You can also check out our DSCSA Compliance Library for all of our resources about the law.

We hope to see you in October!

UAE Tatmeen Track and Trace System: Just the Facts

There’s a deadline coming up for the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system, so we figured it was a good time to take another look at the platform that will, as the government says, “safeguard the entire supply chain.” We’re going to focus on just the facts today. For a more comprehensive look, check out the article we wrote earlier this year.

What is the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system?

“Tatmeen” means “assurance” in Arabic. The Ministry of Health and Prevention (MOHAP) introduced the system in June 2021 “to ensure protection of public health and improve the security of healthcare at all stages.” It will do this by tracking and tracing all pharmaceutical products and medical devices that enter the country.

In addition to MOHAP, three UAE-based organizations are involved in the Tatmeen system:

      • The Dubai Health Authority (DHA) oversees the “complete health sector” in Dubai and promotes engagement with the private sector. Tatmeen will integrate with the DHA’s electronic medical record system and utilize its paperless drug and medical supplies management system.
      • The Department of Health—Abu Dhabi is the regulative body of the healthcare sector in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. It “shapes the regulatory framework for the health system, inspects against regulations, [and] enforce[s] standards.”
      • EVOTEQ is a “digital transformation catalyst” that promotes innovation, including digitalization, particularly in public-private partnerships.

GS1 UAE is also involved, as the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system is based on GS1 standards. This includes using GS1’s BrandSync platform as a central reporting repository.

How does the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system work?

Tatmeen is structured around GS1 barcodes and scanning products as they enter the country and move through the supply chain. Explained simply, the process looks like this:

      1. Manufacturers put a GS1 barcode on every product. Manufacturers are responsible for aggregation. They must obtain a license from MOHAP to import “conventional, biological or other human pharmaceutical products.” As in other countries, this is a multi-step process. See the MOHAP website for more information.
      2. Customs officials scan products to get detailed information and verify they are legitimate before allowing them into the country.
      3. Distributors and logistics providers scan to keep track of inventory, provide another layer of protection, and help ensure products are delivered to the right place in a timely manner.
      4. Healthcare providers at hospitals, clinics, and other facilities scan to verify a product’s legitimacy and expiration date prior to dispensation.
      5. Patients and consumers can also scan to check the safety and authenticity of products.

Tatmeen timeline, next deadline, and news

As we noted above, MOHAP introduced the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system last June. The first deadline was Dec. 13, 2021, when manufacturers and marketing authorization holders had to be registered with the BrandSync platform and begin using 2D DataMatrix codes.

Truth be told, it’s been pretty quiet since then, with industry getting ready for the next deadline — Dec. 13, 2022 — which concerns serial number reporting, aggregation, and Global Location Numbers (GLNs). See our previous article for those details.

Several updated technical documents have been posted on the Tatmeen website this year:

      • Technical Guide for Dispensers (v2.0, March 21, 2022)
      • Technical Guide for Logistics (v3.0, May 30, 2022)
      • Technical Guide for Manufacturers (v4.0, July 6, 2022)

The Tatmeen Serialization Implementation User Guide, “GS1 Barcoding of Conventional Medicines: An Introduction and Reference Guide,” is still in v1.0, dated Aug. 10, 2021.

One notable event was a 4-day Tatmeen workshop held this past June. Co-hosted by MOHAP and EVOTEQ, it gathered representatives from the DHA, the Department of Health–Abu Dhabi, the Emirates Health Services (EHS), and Federal Authority for Identity, Citizenship, Customs and Ports Security to discuss progress made, attracting manufacturers, and connecting stakeholders in the platform.

Speaking at the workshop, Ahmad Ali Al Dashti, assistant undersecretary for the support services sector at MOHAP, and Ali Al Ajmi, director of MOHAP’s Digital Health Department, said the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system is leveraging technology to transform the health sector and continue the country’s position as a role model for assuring the safety of pharma products, including by fighting counterfeits.

Final thoughts

The UAE Tatmeen track and trace system is the perfect example of how the global push for pharmaceutical traceability and serialization is not slowing down. Quite the opposite, in fact.

Sure, some regulations and big deadlines get more attention than others — the U.S. Drug Supply Chain Security Act leaps to mind — but rest assured other countries are hard at work to modernize and digitalize their supply chains. A few examples that we’ve covered recently include Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Egypt, and The African Medicines Agency.

We’re here to help you understand the global regulatory landscape, answer your questions, and help ensure you’re able to do business everywhere you supply chain goes. In terms of the Middle East specifically, we have people on the ground implementing traceability hubs in Lebanon and the Kingdom of Bahrain; we have the know-how to make your supply chain safe, secure, and compliant while optimizing your operations and growing your business.

Contact us today to learn more. In about 15 minutes, we can show you how our automated, intuitive technologies actually make it easy to meet regulations and improve your supply chain.

FDA National Drug Code: Proposed Format Changes & Industry Impact

If you follow our blog (and we know you do), you know that pharma stakeholders will have to verify all products at the individual package level when the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA) goes into full effect about 1 year from now. The FDA National Drug Code, or NDC, is integral to this requirement.

At some point, however, the FDA realized that it was “running out of” National Drug Codes. One reason was the pandemic, which the Agency said “significantly increased the rate at which NDC codes were issued.” In response, on July 22 it published a proposed rule, “Revising the National Drug Code Format and Drug Label Barcode Requirements.”

What does this mean? How will a new FDA National Drug Code format affect the pharma industry? Let’s take a look.

What is the FDA National Drug Code?

The FDA National Drug Code is the Agency’s “standard for uniquely identifying drugs marketed in the United States.” The codes are usually found on product labeling and might be part of the universal product code (UPC). Today, National Drug Codes comprise 10 digits in three segments:

      1. Labeler code (4 or 5 digits), which identifies the labeler. The FDA defines a labeler as “any firm that manufactures (including repackers or relabelers), or distributes (under its own name) the drug.” The FDA assigns labeler codes.
      2. Product code (3 or 4 digits), which identifies strength, dosage form, and formulation for a particular firm. Firms assign product codes.
      3. Packaging code (1 or 2 digits), which identifies the package size and type. Firms assign packaging codes.

National Drug Code formats are commonly referred to as “5-4-1,” “5-4-2” (HIPAA standard), “5-3-2,” or “4-4-2” depending on how many digits each segment has. The illustration below is adapted from an FDA graphic depicting the current format.

Current FDA National Drug Code NDC Format

The Proposed Changes to the FDA National Drug Code

The proposed FDA National Drug Code would have a “uniform” 12-digit, “6-4-2” format, as illustrated below. The Agency says this “would facilitate the adoption of a single NDC format by all stakeholders [and] eliminate the need to convert NDCs from one of FDA’s prescribed formats to a different standardized format used by other sectors of the healthcare industry (e.g., healthcare providers and payors).”

Proposed Changes to FDA National Drug Code NDC

When and how will the change be rolled out?

The FDA proposes an effective date 5 years after the final rule is published “to allow stakeholders time to develop and implement changes to their systems.” Pharma stakeholders that use FDA-assigned codes will need to have systems in place to handle the new format by the effective date.

The Agency would begin assigning new 12-digit National Drug Codes in the 6-4-2 format on the effective date. Drug listing files submitted on or after the effective date would also have to use the new 6-4-2 format.

However, “to reduce the burden on registrants,” the FDA says it won’t require companies to resubmit all of their existing drug listing files; instead, the Agency itself would convert the existing codes “by adding leading zeros to the appropriate segments.” For example:

All FDA National Drug Code NDC

And though the Agency’s proposing a 3-year labeling transition period from the effective date, it’s encouraging manufacturers and distributors to start using the new National Drug Codes as early as possible. Still, during this 3-year period the FDA “does not intend to object to the continued use of 10-digit NDCs on the labeling of products that were assigned a 10-digit NDC prior to the effective date.”

Impact on product labeling

Product labeling will have to be updated with the uniform 12-digit FDA National Drug Code. To make this easier for stakeholders, the Agency proposes revising requirements to allow linear or nonlinear barcodes — as long as they meet mandated standards.

The FDA says it’s also looking into revising 21 CFR 201.25(c), “Bar code label requirements,” to “accommodate potential advances in technologies and standards development by allowing the use of unspecified automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) formats other than linear or non-linear barcodes … without the need to revise the regulation again.”

Industry reaction

These proposed changes to the FDA National Drug Code would affect manufacturers of human and animal drugs, insurers/payors, wholesale distributors, drug databanks, pharmacies, hospitals, small clinics and healthcare practitioners, dentist offices, prisons, nursing care facilities, importers, federal agencies using the National Drug Code, state and local governments, and other supply chain stakeholders that use FDA National Drug Codes.

The pharma industry has known for at least 4 years that the FDA was concerned about running out of codes and was thinking about proposing changes. The Agency held a public hearing on Nov. 5, 2018, “to receive input from stakeholders on how to maximize the benefit and minimize this impact well in advance of any forthcoming change.” Four options were presented at this hearing:

      • Option A: Use 5-digit labeler codes until they run out, then adopt a 6-digit labeler code
      • Option B: Start using 6-digit labeler codes on a designated date
      • Option C: Change to an 11-digit format, then a 12-digit format, when the 5 -digit label codes are gone
      • Option D: Adopt the 12-digit format before the 5-digit labeler codes are gone.

Most comments from industry supported Option D. “Comments were in favor of FDA’s adoption of a single standardized format that could be used by all stakeholders,” the Agency reported. “The majority of the commenters were in favor of FDA establishing a certain date when stakeholders would be required to have systems capable of handling the new format.”

However, industry leaders raised concerns in their public comments. The Healthcare Distribution Alliance (HDA) noted its “agreement with those speaking at the public meeting that … Options, A, B and C, are infeasible. Some of them, for example, would negatively impact bar code technology and interoperability, and others would perpetuate, or even exacerbate the confusion created by the current multiple formats, by adding even more formats. These three Options could also result in creating duplicate NDCs.”

GS1, with input from its New NDC Format Workgroup, advocated for Option D, including implementing “a standards-based format for NDC” (i.e., using a Global Trade Item Number, or GTIN; see below). It also noted concerns, saying this option had “cons,” including its impact on standardized numerical identifiers (SNIs). Let’s examine this a bit further.

FDA National Drug Codes will play a significant role when the DSCSA goes into full effect on Nov. 27, 2023. At that time, drug package labels must include a product identifier. A product identifier is a standardized graphic that contains the product’s SNI, a lot number, and an expiration date. The SNI comprises two data points: the National Drug Code and a unique alphanumeric serial number.

With this in mind, GS1 commented that the “SNI Guidance will need modification in advance of and as preparation for Option D implementation. The SNI guidance defined SNI as NDC + serial number. However … this does not support unique identification at every level of the packaging hierarchy, and therefore is not sufficient to support traceability. GS1 members had been able to overcome this challenge by embedding the NDC in a GTIN. However, with Option D, members will no longer have this technical mechanism.”

Final thoughts

That’s a lot to think about. The comment period for the FDA National Drug Code proposed rule ends Nov. 22, 2022, and industry stakeholders are sure to once again share their opinions in the docket. Some of the issues that could be raised include the following:

      • Companies’ serialization systems and ancillary systems could be affected because they contain and use FDA National Drug Codes.
      • Systems will have to accept and store both the current and new formats.
      • Stakeholders will have to know which format to send and when.
      • Systems may have to carry both formats simultaneously for current medicines.

The biggest takeaway, though, is that companies should be thinking about the change and preparing now. This is a DSCSA mantra, right? Prepare for the Verification Router Service (VRS). Prepare for ATPs. Prepare for  product identification, serialization, and EPCIS.

If you have questions, contact us today to speak to one of our  DSCSA and supply chain experts. We’re participating on the GS1 New NDC Format Workgroup and have been actively involved in discussions about how the changes will affect pharma companies. With only a little more than a year to go before rollout of the DCSCA is complete, now is the time to connect with us and make sure you’re going to be ready for the full serialization of the U.S. pharma supply chain.

 

DSCSA Summary: A Look at the Law as We Count Down to 2023

As the clock continues to tick toward the November 27, 2023, U.S. Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA) deadline, we thought it was a good time for a recap. Our DSCSA summary will hit the major milestones, changes from the FDA, and compliance requirements.

We’ll also include an updated timeline graphic that first appeared during our three-part DSCSA webinar series last summer, which dealt with authorized trading partners (ATPs), EPCIS, and the Verification Router Service (VRS). We wrote about those topics twice just last week: Check out our FDA DSCSA Guidance Update: EPICS, ATPs, and the Countdown to 2023 and the Q&A with our SVP of Product and Strategy Herb Wong.

Now, on to the DSCSA summary: everything you need to know in 5 minutes.

What is the DSCSA?

The DSCSA is a 10-year plan to transform the U.S. pharmaceutical supply chain. It became law in November 2013, as Title II of the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA), and has been rolled out since 2015. Implementation culminates on November 27, 2023, at which time the U.S. pharmaceutical supply chain will be fully serialized.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says the goal of the DSCSA is “to build an electronic, interoperable system to identify and trace certain prescription drugs as they are distributed in the United States.”

Furthermore, the DSCSA “will enhance [the] FDA’s ability to help protect consumers from exposure to drugs that may be counterfeit, stolen, contaminated, or otherwise harmful” and “improve detection and removal of potentially dangerous drugs from the drug supply chain to protect U.S. consumers.”

Who has to comply?

Manufacturers, wholesalers, dispensers, repackagers, and third-party logistics providers (3PLs) must comply with DSCSA if they want to do business in the United States.

Key requirements

The FDA puts DSCSA requirements into four categories. This is what Herb Wong calls “the four cornerstones” of the law.

1. Product identification (serialization). A unique product identifier (PI), such as a bar code, must be placed on certain prescription drug packages.

2. Product tracing. Stakeholders must provide information about a drug and who handled it each time it’s sold. This includes the following:

        • Transaction information (TI) includes the product name; its strength and dosage form; its National Drug Code (NDC); container size and number of containers; lot number; transaction date; shipment date; and the name and address of the businesses from which and to which ownership is being transferred. Note: We’ll be writing more about NDCs soon.
        • The transaction statement (TS) is a paper or electronic attestation by the business transferring ownership of the product that it has complied with the DSCSA.
        • Transaction history (TH) is an electronic statement with the TI for every transaction going back to the manufacturer. Note: TH will not be required after the November 2023 deadline.

For the record, the FDA defines “transaction” as the “transfer of product between persons in which a change of ownership occurs.”

3. Verification (VRS). Stakeholders must establish systems and processes to verify PIs for certain prescription drugs packages. The Verification Router Service (VRS) enables a rapid, secure exchange of data to do this

4. Authorized trading partners (ATPs). The DSCSA also says that if you’re not an ATP, your access to the U.S. pharma supply chain will be severely restricted or denied altogether. All manufacturers, wholesale distributors, repackagers, 3PLs, and dispensers and their trading partners must be ATPs

If you want to know more, read our in-depth explanations of the VRS and ATPs. Or just contact us today to talk to one of our DSCSA experts!

Other requirements

Detection and response + notification. Stakeholders must quarantine and promptly investigate suspect or illegitimate drugs. They must also notify the FDA and other interested parties when they find such drugs.

Licensing. Wholesalers must report their licensing status and contact information to the FDA. Third-party logistics providers must obtain a state or federal license.

DSCSA Summary: Timeline

The FDA has delayed the rollout of the DSCSA two times (September 2019 and October 2020). However, an FDA official said in August 2021 that there would be no more delays. November 27, 2023, is a done deal.

DSCSA Timeline 2013-2023

 

Final thoughts

If you have any questions about this DSCSA summary, contact us today. There might be one or two things that surprised you — like the sunsetting of the transaction history (TH) requirement — and we want to make sure you’re sure about what’s happening.

Our extensive writing about the law is a valuable resource, but nothing beats spending 15 minutes with one of our supply chain experts. So schedule a short demo of our DSCSA compliance solution. Our No. 1 priority is to help you understand the regulations and be prepared for the full serialization of the U.S. pharma supply chain next November.

And if you happen to be going to this year’s HDA Traceability Seminar in Washington, D.C., drop us a line here to arrange a meeting and be sure to catch Herb Wong in the “EPCIS Onboarding Across the Supply Chain” panel discussion and his roundtable about industry readiness for November 2023.

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSCSA Compliance Update with Herb Wong: What’s Happening Right Now?

Herb Wong’s a busy guy. We said that the last time we did a DSCSA compliance update with him, and it’s still true today Just last week, for instance, he participated in two Healthcare Distribution Alliance (HDA) webinars, “DSCSA 2023: How a Service Provider Can Help You Prepare” and “All About the VRS.” These were part of the HDA’s 2022 Traceability Webinar Series, which Antares Vision Group is sponsoring.

That’s why it was such a treat to get some one-on-one time with Herb for a real-time DSCSA compliance update — what’s happening right now with industry readiness.

We asked Herb to talk about what he calls “the four cornerstones” of DSCSA compliance: product identification (EPCIS and serialization), product tracing, authorized trading partners (ATPs), and verification (the Verification Router Service, or VRS). Here’s what he had to say.

DSCSA compliance update #1: product identification (EPCIS and serialization)

All solution providers’ systems are ready to send and receive serialization data in the EPCIS format, but we still need to help the industry get data flowing. To use an analogy, even though the pipes have been laid and connected, we’re just not getting enough water through to test for “leaks” in the system — errors in send/receive processing. Just as important, we need time to “flush the pipes” to ensure that we have “clean water.” By that I mean ensuring that the data is correct.

We’re trying to do everything we can. We’ve actually developed a standard process for onboarding customers and getting data exchanged with other solution partners. We’re going to be piloting this so we can refine the onboarding process. [Herb’s talking about the EPCIS Onboarding Guide Workgroup and its draft “Guide for Accelerated EPCIS Onboarding.”]

What’s the key takeaway, Herb?

The key takeaway is, “Let’s connect, let’s get the serialized data out.” Time is running out. That’s the biggest message. People who think they have time to wait until next year, you really don’t. Because what’s going to happen is similar to what happened when the lot-based laws went live: The people who waited couldn’t find help. All the solution providers were busy; everyone was busy. And everyone who waited was trying to get through the same door to meet the deadline.

So, if you’re a manufacturer, you have to start sending data early. If you’re serializing and not sending data downstream, start now. Don’t wait till the November 2023 deadline. You have to “turn on the switch.” Send your data downstream now.

At this point, we decided to ask Herb about aggregation.

DSCSA doesn’t say anything about aggregation. But wholesalers are asking for aggregation to support their business processes. When you send electronic data, wholesalers need to know what serial numbers are in the cases they just received.

Aggregation is a business requirement for operational efficiency. For example, if you get 10 cases with a hundred items in each case, you don’t want to open the cases and scan every item to see what you received and will ultimately ship. Aggregation makes things faster and more efficient. It’s similar to how VRS had both a legal and a business requirement: The legal requirement mandated a response within 24 hours for saleable returns verification. But given the potential volume of saleable returns, 24 hours was too slow for wholesalers; it would cause the receiving docs to fill up with products pending verification. For this reason, wholesalers mandated a business requirement of sub-second response times.

DSCSA compliance update #2: product tracing

A centralized solution or standard has not been defined for product tracing. A lot of different approaches have been discussed, but there’ve been no specs, no firm requirements, that solution providers can implement at this time.

Right now, we’re supporting the industry’s manual process for product tracing. The HDA, NABP, and PDG have done a really good job of outlining what’s required for tracing. [That’s the Healthcare Distribution Alliance, the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, and the Partnership for DSCSA Governance.]

They’ve walked through a series of scenarios that can be executed manually and have helped the industry to better understand the complexity and nuances of tracing a product through the system. In parallel to this effort, the PDG is working on a data format to communicate traceability requests and responses. PDG is putting that information into a JSON format to communicate the need. [JSON is the JavaScript Object Notation data interchange format. Its advantages are that it uses human-readable text and is a more compact means of communicating data.]

What’s the key takeaway, Herb?

Pay attention to the traceability scenarios that are coming out of the HDA, NABP, and PDG. They’re doing a really good job of trying to show how tracing workflows will happen. They’ll be publishing more results and helping the industry understand. Watch for these, because it will enlighten you about what’s coming in 2023.

DSCSA compliance update #3 and #4: ATPs and VRS

From a solution provider standpoint, the ATP and VRS initiatives have become one and the same. Right now, ATPs have only been applied against the VRS, so the timing for us to get that done has become one implementation effort.

When you make a VRS request, you have to prove you’re an ATP. ATP is there to confirm two things: you are who you say you are and you are authorized to transact business. Proof that you are an ATP is especially important in the VRS network since trading partners may not have direct relationships with other VRS participants.

For VRS, there’s a new version 1.3 that will be deployed before the DSCSA 2023 deadline. The current version we have is based on the 1.2 standards interface. The 1.3 version “opens up” VRS beyond what it was intended to do, which is the verification of saleable returns.

What people should know is that VRS 1.3 is not backwards-compatible. This means VRS providers have to upgrade at once. To ensure that the upgrade occurs on time, solution providers have agreed to “decouple” the 1.3 interface from the 1.3 functionality.

What this means is that everyone on the VRS network will remain connected since we will all support the new 1.3 connections. However, solution providers (or customers) who are not ready to upgrade to the new 1.3 functionality can continue to use VRS as needed. That’s going to be important because it allows us to change the interface so we can at least keep talking to each other. We can be interoperable. But not everyone has to support the features of 1.3 at the same time.

As for timing of the update, we’re talking about doing the testing of the interoperability of 1.3 in Q1 [of 2023]. So we’ll have to push this into a production environment after Q1, but we haven’t agreed on a production date.

What’s the key takeaway, Herb?

There is going to be an upgrade required soon and the industry and solution providers are working to make sure it’s easy to implement. We realize that is not as simple as a software upgrade but we need to carefully consider the revalidation requirements of our customers.

Final thoughts

And there you have it: A DSCSA compliance update about what’s happening right now with industry readiness for product identification (EPCIS and serialization), product tracing, and ATPs and VRS. Thanks, Herb!

Contact us if you have questions about what Herb talked about or the DSCSA in general. We can explain the requirements and how our solutions will help ensure you’re ready for November 2023 and the full serialization of the U.S. pharmaceutical supply chain.

If you like, we can probably arrange a meeting with Herb. But remember, he’s busy. In the coming weeks, he’ll travel to the Antares Vision Group global HQ in Italy, visit the Group’s brand-new North America HQ in New Jersey, and join a panel discussion at the HDA Traceability Seminar in Washington, D.C. (Antares Vision Group is also a sponsor of that annual event.) So reach out today and let’s see what we can work out.

Also take a look at our DSCSA Compliance Library. It’s a clearinghouse of information with links to our blog posts, white papers, webinars — everything — about the law, including the “four cornerstones” Herb talked about in today’s DSCSA compliance update.

Why Cosmetics Supply Chain Sustainability Is the Industry’s Hottest Topic

The health and beauty industry is under increasing pressure from regulatory bodies and consumers to maintain and demonstrate due diligence in their supply chains. Forward-thinking companies are responding by making cosmetics supply chain sustainability an integral part of their mission statements and consumer engagement activities.

For example, “The Big 3” are prioritizing cosmetics supply chain sustainability. L’Oréal puts environmental and social performance at the heart of its business to drive value.  Estée Lauder’s mission is “to bring the best to everyone we touch and to support the environment in which we live.” And Unilever reports thoroughly on environmental and ethical statistics, including water, energy, greenhouse gases, waste and plastic packaging, sustainable sourcing, and community investment.

So let’s take a look at  sustainability in the cosmetics supply chain. The industry faces a slew of challenges with sustainability, such as environmental and human rights issues, counterfeiting, an evolving regulatory landscape, changes in consumer behavior, and utilizing new technologies, and all affect their decisions and processes.

What is “sustainability”?

Before we get into cosmetics supply chain sustainability, let’s take a step back for a moment and talk about sustainability generally.

Sustainability might seem to be a relatively new concept, but it has been around since the 19th century, when some industries sought to improve working environments and create less pollution. In the 1960s, new laws and organizational bodies were introduced to address pollution in the United States and Europe.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) “is required under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) to evaluate all major agency actions to determine if they will have a significant impact on the human environment.” Federal agencies implement NEPA and evaluate the possibility for environmental impacts by condcuting categorical exclusions, environmental assessments, and environmental impact statements.

The European Commission says it “aims to ensure coherence between industrial, environmental, climate and energy policy to create an optimal business environment for sustainable growth, job creation and innovation.”

In 2015, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) adopted the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community Blueprint 2025, which “promotes and ensures balanced social development and sustainable environment that meet the needs of the peoples at all times.”

If you read our Global Cosmetics Market white paper, you’ll know why we used the United States, Europe, and Asia as examples: They’re the world’s top cosmetics markets — and their regulators are concerned about sustainability.

What is cosmetics supply chain sustainability?

Cosmetics supply chain sustainability addresses the environmental and human impact of products, from the sourcing and production of raw materials, through to manufacturing, packaging, distribution to the final customer, and post-consumer activities.

Increasingly, there are calls for cosmetics supply chain sustainability standards to be made mandatory. The European Parliament in March passed a resolution to tackle environmental and human rights in EU supply chains. This new Supply Chain Act will require organizations to integrate sustainability into corporate governance and management systems, and frame business decisions in terms of human rights, climate, and environmental impact.

The United States is yet to follow suit, but consumer groups are letting the government know they want tighter standards for the raw materials used in cosmetics.

Even without government mandates, organizations that want to burnish their environmental credentials would do well start with their supply chains. In a January 2021 report called Net Zero Challenge: The Supply Chain Opportunity, the World Economic Forum states that companies wanting to improve their environmental and social performance can look to their supply chains to make cost-effective improvements.

Environmentally responsible production: the rise of “Clean Beauty”

Much of the drive toward sustainability is coming from consumers, who want to know that ingredients are pure (or at the very least safe) and have been ethically sourced. For example, 62 percent of Generation Z consumers (born in the late 1990s) prefer to buy from sustainable brands, and 73 percent will pay more for sustainable products.

In the United States, where the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from being used in cosmetics, there is mounting pressure for stricter regulations. For example, environmental and consumer advocate groups such as the Environmental Working Group (EWG) believe more chemicals should banned, like in the EU, where 1,300+ substances are prohibited from being used in cosmetics.

This is part of larger “Clean Beauty” movement that advocates for safe, clean ingredients and transparency in product labeling. According to a

Clean Beauty is also concerned with ethical sourcing of ingredients. Consumers want reassurance that their cosmetics are not linked to issues such as deforestation, pollution, and animal or child cruelty. The primary problem here is that a wide variety of cosmetic products use a few “core” ingredients, many of which pose unique challenges for achieving sustainability in the cosmetics supply chain. They are difficult to obtain sustainably and ethically, and child labor, poor working conditions, and illegal mining are common.

For example, a 2016 report from the Amsterdam-based nonprofit Centre for Research on Multinational Corporations (SOMO) found that more than 20,000 children are forced to work in mica mines while their families live in severe poverty. Similarly, palm oil, the global market for which is expected to reach $57.2 billion by 2026, has a history of human rights problems. Palm oil is used for moisturizing or texture effects.

As more companies stake their reputations on being sustainable and consumers become more aware and demanding, it’s certain that the call for cosmetics supply chain sustainability will only get stronger.

How can we achieve cosmetics supply chain sustainability?

As we’ve seen, cosmetics companies operate in a challenging environment where many groups — including consumers, perhaps their most important audience — are calling for them to achieve sustainability in their supply chains.

To be successful, they must be able to adapt to changes in the market as technology, product development, and consumer sentiment shape the industry. Whether it’s faster production methods, demand for new products, or desire for ethical and sustainable options, companies must be able to change with the market if they want to survive and succeed.

The key takeaway is that cosmetics supply chain sustainability is not a pipe dream. Technology and solutions exist right now to help companies evaluate their operations and identify strengths, weaknesses, and pain points and take corrective action. These include supply chain digitalization, cloud-based data systems, and real-time monitoring. For instance, a 2021 report by Gartner said that digitalization is a key enabler of agility because it supports a more transparent, automated, intelligent, and orchestrated end-to-end supply chain.

Final thoughts

Sustainability. Consumers want it. More and more regulators are demanding it. It’s good for the planet. It’s good for people. It’s a business best practice.

Is it difficult to attain sustainability? Yes and no. It is a process. It has a lot of moving parts that may require tough decisions. But if a company has the will to be sustainable, it can develop strategies, chart a course, and get to work … and reap the benefits.

Technology is essential for sustainability. rfxcel and Antares Vision Group are committed to helping companies meet their sustainability goals and empowering them to protect product, profit, people, and planet.

Our Traceability System enables you to see and follow everything in your supply chain in real time from virtually anywhere in the world. It makes every product a “digital asset” with a certified, sharable provenance that proves to consumers and regulators that your sustainability initiatives are real and working as intended. Its intuitive, scalable solutions can be used individually or as a complete platform to shepherd sustainability initiatives to completion and create end-to-end traceability, transparency, and visibility.

Contact us today to see how it works. And be sure to check out our other resources about the cosmetics industry, sustainability, and traceability:

What Is the Healthcare Value Chain and Why Is It Important?

In the healthcare sector, delayed, lost, and damaged products can cause grave danger, as patients might not receive the medicines they need on time and many items are susceptible to fluctuations in environmental conditions. That’s why it’s crucial to have a reliable and robust healthcare value chain.

Let’s examine the critical role that the healthcare value chain plays. Our technologies and solutions help pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, and other healthcare stakeholders streamline and manage their entire supply chain, from procurement to distribution.

Understanding the healthcare value chain

Most may believe that the value chain and supply chain are synonymous. However, they are two different terms describing different aspects of supply logistics. The supply chain refers to the movement of goods from suppliers to customers; the value chain encompasses all activities involved in creating and delivering a product or service.

In other words, the supply chain is more about the physical movement of goods and the value chain adds value to a product, including production, marketing, and customer support after the sale. So, the healthcare value chain allows medical institutions to provide patients with the best possible care by ensuring they have the supplies and treatments they need when they need them.

What happens in a healthcare value chain?

Understanding the activities involved in the healthcare value chain is the first step in managing and streamlining its processes. We’re talking about logistics, operations, marketing and sales, and service.

Inbound logistics. The value chain is not a product-driven process, so explaining inbound logistics can be challenging. Generally, inbound logistics in a value chain refers to the quality of inventory and the management of that inventory. Value-driven inbound logistics ensures that all inventory is accounted for and is of the highest quality. This includes checking that items are not expired or damaged and meet all necessary requirements (e.g., internal quality control, standard operating procedures).

Operations. The operations stage of the healthcare value chain is where the actual product or service is produced. In this value-driven scenario, product operations and/or manufacturing aim to reduce waste and create efficiencies. This might involve automating processes, changing production methods, and improving the quality of raw materials. In healthcare, the goal of operations might be to streamline the manufacturing of drugs or medical devices.

Outbound logistics. Like inbound logistics, outbound logistics in a value chain should strive to ensure that a product or service reaches the customer in the best possible condition and in a timely manner. In healthcare, this means making sure that patients receive their supplies and treatments when they need them, as well as ensuring products are safe and legitimate.

It’s also important to note that outbound logistics isn’t just about the distribution of supplies outside a warehouse. It also concerns how medical institutions distribute supplies internally. This is important to consider when managing a hospital or other medical facility.

Marketing and sales. Marketing and sales in the healthcare value chain focus on creating demand for a product or service. Traditionally, this includes advertising, promotions, and other marketing initiatives. In a value-driven context, marketing and sales are strategically designed to go beyond a one-time sale to create long-term relationships with customers. There are numerous ways to do this, ranging from creating educational materials for patients and promoting online services to partnering with insurance providers.

Service. The service stage of the healthcare value chain is where post-sales activities occur, such as continuing customer support, repairs, and maintenance. Value-driven service helps maintain customer satisfaction with the product or service and helps ensure their needs are being met. Customer loyalty programs, follow-up communications, and offering extended warranties are common examples.

The healthcare value chain in numbers

Now that we’ve summarized the different stages of the healthcare value chain, let’s look at some numbers that help illustrate why these processes are so vital to the healthcare industry.

One 2019 report found that clinicians devote about 17 percent of their time to logistics and storage management activities. This affects their productivity and the quality of care they can provide.

The report also found that more than 4,500 different medical devices and products are recalled every year — and 10 percent of these have the potential to cause harm or death. One study published by the well-known consulting outfit McKinsey & Company reported that the “costs of a single non-routine quality event, like a major recall, have been as high as $600 [million] in medical device companies.”

The long-term business benefits of an effective healthcare value chain

An effective healthcare value chain creates benefits beyond improving quality of care and securing patient safety and satisfaction. It creates business benefits, including:

Improved profitability. An effective healthcare value chain can boost a bottom line by improving supply systems, reducing waste, and creating efficiencies across healthcare systems.

Promoting innovation. Less waste and more efficient systems mean savvy companies can devote more resources to R&D that can lead to innovation in all realms, including the development of new treatments or therapies and better manufacturing and distribution schemes.

Helping meet business goals. An effective healthcare value chain contributes to business success by reducing waste, increasing efficiencies, and promoting innovation. It also helps businesses connect with customers and build brand loyalty.

Final thoughts

What’s the main takeaway from this overview of the healthcare value chain? Establishing an agile and robust value chain is essential to success in the healthcare industry — in every industry.

We’ve specialized in creating software solutions for the healthcare value chain (and the healthcare supply chain) for almost 20 years. Our No. 1 priority is to help businesses optimize their operations and improve the quality of the products they manufacture and deliver to consumers.

For the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries, this means providing a digital traceability platform that helps ensure your devices and medications are safe, are transported following proper protocols (e.g., routes and environmental parameters), are delivered on time, and meet all regulatory requirements. It means real-time data and visibility into every aspect of your operations from virtually any location in the world.

rfxcel and Antares Vision Group understand the healthcare value chain, its complexities, and how to optimize it for patient security, customer satisfaction, and business success. Contact us today to schedule a short demo of our solutions. Our experts will answer your questions and show you why major global healthcare and pharmaceutical companies rely on our technology to secure and improve their operations.