September 2020 - rfxcel.com
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rfxcel Welcomes Lincoln Manning as Chief Revenue Officer

Reno, Nevada, Sept. 17, 2020. rfxcel, the global leader in digital supply chain traceability solutions, today announced that Lincoln Manning has joined its executive team as chief revenue officer. Mr. Manning will be responsible for all aspects of revenue generation, including worldwide sales, ecosystem partnerships, sales operations, and systems engineering for the company’s verticals, which include the life sciences (pharmaceuticals and medical devices), food and beverage, government, and consumer goods.

“We are glad to have Lincoln on our team,” said rfxcel CEO and Co-Founder Glenn Abood. “He brings a wealth of experience from diverse industries that he’ll be able to leverage across rfxcel. We are particularly excited about his devotion to and excellence in anticipating what customers need and doing what it takes to ensure they succeed. This is one of our corporate values.

“Lincoln also has a track record of building and strengthening sales teams. Our sales teams are solid in every market, but Lincoln will take them to the next level, helping us maintain our leadership where we’re already established and build our presence where we’re still growing.”

Prior to joining rfxcel, Mr. Manning held executive-level positions at software and digital marketing companies. He led sales, marketing, and customer success teams to increase revenue, reinvent business ecosystems, navigate post-merger corporate change, and reset reseller channels.

“There couldn’t be a more perfect time to be joining rfxcel,” Mr. Manning said. “Our mission of keeping the supply chain safe in key verticals is more important today than ever. I believe rfxcel is uniquely positioned globally to ensure products are safely delivered to patients and consumers, because of our agility and ability to respond to customer needs in today’s ever-changing environment.”

Mr. Abood co-founded rfxcel with Chief Strategy Officer Jack Tarkoff in 2003, so Mr. Manning joins the company as it celebrates 17 years of supply chain innovations and growth. Recent successes include conducting major pharma pilots for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Brazilian government; tripling the size of its team in Russia and being named an official software and integration partner of the Center for Research in Perspective Technologies (CRPT), which operates Russia’s National Track and Trace Digital System (Chestny ZNAK); releasing the latest version of its award-winning rfxcel Traceability Solution; increasing its presence in the Middle East; and being named 2020 Software Company of the Year by Nevada’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology (NCET).

“Lincoln’s joining us at a busy time,” Abood said. “We’re keeping our customers’ supply chains running during the pandemic, improving our products and developing new solutions, and expanding our operations globally. Lincoln will be a huge asset as we continue to secure and optimize the pharma, food and beverage, government, and consumer goods supply chains. By strengthening our commitment to our customers, he’ll strengthen rfxcel. We’re all excited to have him on the team.”

For more information about rfxcel’s solutions, contact Herb Wong, vice president of marketing and strategic initiatives, at hwong@rfxcel.com or 925-824-0300.

 

About rfxcel

Founded in 2003, rfxcel provides leading-edge software solutions to help companies build and manage every aspect of a digital supply chain, lower costs, and protect their products and brand reputations. Blue-chip organizations in the life sciences (pharmaceuticals and medical devices), food and beverage, worldwide government, and consumer goods industries trust rfxcel’s signature Traceability System (rTS) to power end-to-end supply chain solutions in key areas such as track and trace, environmental monitoring, regulatory compliance, serialization, and visibility. The company is headquartered in the United States and has offices in the United Kingdom, the EU, Latin America, Russia, India, Japan, the Middle East, and the Asia-Pacific region.

Why We Need Wine Industry Track and Trace, Part 2

Welcome to Part 2 of our wine industry track and trace miniseries. In Part 1, we talked about how track and trace technology can help protect the wine supply chain by building product provenance, fighting counterfeits and illicit trade, streamlining logistics, and building consumer confidence and trust.

Part 2 gets into the details of the wine supply chain — its key actors and their responsibilities for wine industry track and trace. There’s a lot to cover, so let’s get started.

The wine supply chain, defined

The wine supply chain has the same core stakeholders as other supply chains: producers, distributors, and retailers. In its 2009 Wine Supply Chain Traceability Guideline, GS1 says these can be characterized as large companies with “significant technology requirements”; small- to medium-sized enterprises, many with niche specialty products and branding; and “support companies that provide materials, transportation, storage, and other services that are also impacted by traceability.”

GS1 further divides the supply chain into seven stakeholders: grape growers, wine producers, bulk distributors, transit cellars, fillers/packers, distributors, and retail stores. We describe these below, including their roles in wine industry track and trace.

Supply chain actors and their roles in wine industry track and trace

Ingredients and final products can change hands many, many times, so all actors must keep meticulous records and follow GS1 labeling standards to ensure wine industry track and trace. The requirements do get complicated, but there are a few fundamentals to keep in mind:

  • Global Location Numbers (GLNs)
  • Global Trade Item Numbers (GTINs)
  • Serial Shipping Container Codes (SSCCs)
  • Application Identifiers (AIs)
  • GS1-128 barcodes
  • Human-readable codes
  • Universal Product Codes (UPCs) and European Article Numbers (EANs)

Grape growers

Grape growers are responsible for the production, harvest, and delivery of grapes. Wine industry track and trace begins with them, so they must keep detailed records about receiving, shipping, and the vineyard itself. The latter includes the type of vines, annual production record, origin and chemical content of water used for cleaning and irrigation, and treatments (e.g., fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides).

Key data for track and trace describes the “plot” or “block” where grapes are grown. This land is identified with a GLN allocated by the grower and should include five pieces of information:

  1. The vineyard’s name and address
  2. The identifier for the plot
  3. Size of the plot/number of vines
  4. Vine variety
  5. Contact details

Every shipment of grapes the growers send should have a GLN and the date of harvest so the receiving winery can have this provenance for the wine it makes.

Wine producers

Wine producers receive the grapes and produce, manufacture, and/or blend wine products. Key wine industry track and trace data follows the grapes as they’re transformed into wine, so producers must keep accurate records of the procedures they use to make every wine. This includes:

  • The grape growers’ GLNs
  • The wine producer’s own GLN
  • The location(s) at the winery where grapes or juice are processed, including de-stemming, crushing, chilling, and pressing
  • A GTIN for each product
  • An SSCC for shipping containers (e.g., tanker trucks)
  • An AI (315n) to indicate the quantity dispatched in liters
  • An AI (10) to indicate the batch number

Bulk distributors

Bulk distributors receive wine in bulk from wine producers and send it to transit cellars. They also store, dispatch, process, sample, and analyze bulk wine. The wine they receive has been identified with a GTIN and a batch number; like their downstream and upstream trading partners, they must keep records about what they receive and dispatch, including recording the SSCCs and AIs associated with bulk wine containers.

Bulk distributors are identified with GLNs. Bulk wine containers, such as storage tanks, may hold only one product, or they may hold mixed products with mixed batch numbers; these have different labeling requirements. Generally, they’re identified with an SSCC allocated by the bulk distributor. When put into barcode form, the SSCC is “represented in a GS1-128 symbol.” The containers may also require a GTIN and AIs for batch and quantity.

Transit cellars

Transit cellars are responsible for the receipt, storage, dispatch, processing, sampling, and analysis of bulk wine, plus keeping records about what they receive and dispatch. They may be part of a filler/packer company at the same site or at another location. They can also be a third-party service provider.

For wine industry track and trace, every container a transit cellar sends must be identified with an SSCC, a GTIN, a batch number, and the quantity of wine in liters. This information is encoded in a GS1-128 barcode and in human readable form. To ensure track and trace in the wine industry, transit cellars must record every SSCC, GTIN, and batch number of every item they ship.

Fillers/Packers

Fillers/Packers receive containers of bulk wine from a bulk distributor or a transit cellar. Their job is to put the wine into smaller containers, such as bottles, bags, kegs, and barrels, then send cases, cartons, pallets, or “other logistics units” to finished goods distributors. For wine industry track and trace, here are how these units should be labeled:

  • Cases and cartons sold at retail are identified with a GTIN and a barcode with an EAN/UPC symbol. A lot number encoded in a GS1-128 barcode should also applied as an “add-on.” Cases and cartons that will not be sold at retail are identified with AIs and GTINs encoded in a GS1-128 barcode.
  • Pallets are marked with SSCCs. Filler/Packers can also include a GS1-128 barcode with AIs containing other information that maintains the parent-child relationship between the pallet and its contents.
  • Point-of-sale units (e.g., bottles, cans, jugs, bags in boxes) are identified with a GTIN and have a barcode with an EAN/UPC symbol for scanning at the time of purchase. In the EU and elsewhere, units must display a lot number assigned during the filling process. This information can be in human readable form.

Fillers/Packers also receive the “dry goods” that come in contact with wine, such as bottles, caps, and corks, and must label them with SSCCs, GTINs, and batch numbers. Fillers/Packers also have to record other information about dry goods, such as the water used to wash filling equipment and any chemicals used for cleaning.

Distributors

Distributors receive, store, and dispatch finished goods to retailers. They are also responsible for inventory management, and may repack or re-label goods at a retailer’s request.

If cases, cartons, and pallets are not broken up before being shipped to a retailer, the identification from the filler/packer (e.g., SSCC, GTIN, EAN/UPC symbols) does not change. If items are repacked, each gets a new SSCC. (The original SSCC must be crossed out or obscured). Distributors must record the SSCC, GTIN, and lot number of the items they ship and link these to the GLN of the recipient.

The “Traceability data and GS1 Standards” for items shipped by distributors are as follows (quoted verbatim):

  • SSCC of the inbound pallet and GLN of its supplier
  • SSCC of the outbound pallet, either unmodified or newly created
  • Links between the SSCC of the newly created pallet and the SSCC of the pallets used in its creation and, if applicable, the GTIN and lot number of each carton shipped to the retailer
  • GLN of the retail location to which the pallet is dispatched

Retail stores

Retailers receive wine from the finished goods distributor for retail sale. The wine is usually delivered in cases, cartons, and pallets, and records of their SSCCs and lot numbers must be kept. Individual units sold to the final consumer are identified with a GTIN-13 allocated by the brand owner. UPCs or EANs ensure products are scanned/traced all the way to sale to consumers. If a retailer returns goods to a supplier, it must ensure it doesn’t break the wine industry track and trace links that have been established.

Final thoughts

The wine supply chain is complex. Wine industry track and trace will help protect it, make it more efficient, improve communication among stakeholders, and fulfill consumers’ ever-growing expectations for more information about the products they buy.

rfxcel is ready to help. Our rfxcel Traceability System simplifies wine industry track and trace. From raw materials to finished goods, our solutions ensure you build a data-rich provenance for your products, communicate clearly with all your trading partners, comply with industry and government requirements, and give consumers the information they demand. Contact us today to schedule a demo and see what we can do.

The L1-L5 Solution Providers, Explained

Jargon. For better or for worse, it’s a fact of life — more so for people like us who work in the highly technical field of supply chain management. From ANSI to XML, an alphabet soup of shop talk can rain down upon us without warning, often leaving us scratching our heads (or at least searching online). L1-L5 solution provider? What does that mean?

And if we say rfxcel is an L4 and L5 solution provider, what does that mean? With as little jargon as possible, let’s find out. (Hint: It has nothing to do with alleviating back pain.)

What does the “L” stand for in L1-L5 solution provider?

The “L” in “L1-L5 solution provider” stands for “level,” as in the level of serialization in a supply chain. To put a finer point on it, it means the level of serialization and information management in a supply chain. And if you hadn’t guessed, there are five levels:

  • Level 1: Device
  • Level 2: Packaging
  • Level 3: Site
  • Level 4: Enterprise
  • Level 5: Network

The list above progresses from the smallest or most localized level, the L1 device level, to the most expansive and all-encompassing level, the L5 network level. Generally, L1, L2, and L3 are grouped together because they’re happening where products are created and packaged; L4 and L5 are paired together in the realm where those products enter the greater supply chain to make their way to their final destinations.

When talking about L1-L5, let’s work backwards from largest to smallest. This way, we can “zoom in on” the details and put everything in a more vivid context.

Level 5: Network

L5 is where rfxcel has its roots and where we built our reputation for supply chain excellence. The network level is where all serialization and regulatory data is managed, including with your trading partners, regulatory authorities and their repositories, and customers. It ensures you’re communicating with partners and complying with regulations.

Level 4: Enterprise

rfxcel’s roots also run deep in L4, which manages and verifies all your serialization and regulatory data/compliance reporting before sending it to L5. It also generates your serial numbers and manages all your business processes. When you design your solutions for L1, L2, and L3, you must decide how they will integrate with your L4 solution.

Level 3: Site

This is where we enter your actual manufacturing facilities and processes. L3 manages the line systems (i.e., L2) at your site to ensure that they are working optimally. L3 is optional; if present, it serves as the “middle man” between L4 and L2, requesting serial numbers from the former and allocating them to the latter.  L3 will also verify the L2 data before it is submitted to L4.

Level 2: Packaging

L2 systems control the L1 hardware and manage the serial numbers which are printed and applied on packages by L1 devices. L2 systems will communicate with the L4 (or L3,f present) to send/receive serial numbers as needed.

Level 1: Device

L1 comprises devices on a packaging line that enable serial numbers to be affixed to packaging and products, such as barcode printers, label printers, and labelers. It also includes cameras and scanners used for quality control, such as visual inspections of products and labeling.

rfxcel is an L4 and L5 solution provider that integrates with L2 and L3

As we said above, we’ve built a reputation for excellence for L4 and L5, the enterprise and network levels. This is our business: Creating innovative software solutions that optimize key supply chain requirements and functions — from the nuts and bolts of serialization and regulatory compliance to environmental monitoring and data analytics — and bring true end-to-end track and trace capabilities to any supply chain.

Our solutions ensure you’re communicating with all your trading partners, all regulatory bodies and their repositories, and your customers. We’ll help keep your lines running smoothly. We’ll yield rich, actionable data that you can use to improve your operations, connect with your customers, and build consumer trust and brand reputation.

We create one uniform, harmonized supply chain that takes care of everything from unit-level serialization and global compliance network needs to closing the last mile all the way to the person buying your product.

Final thoughts

All levels are important. They rely on one another to make things work. When you’re planning a serialization solution, you have to think very carefully about how they’ll interact and communicate.

rfxcel makes sure your data is accurate, travels quickly between and among levels, and meets the requirements of your partners and government authorities — no matter what systems you have in place now or will get in the future. Interconnectivity and interoperability are the cornerstones of all our implementations.

If you have questions about L1-L5, are looking to build a solution, or are considering switching solution providers, contact us today to talk with one of our supply chain experts and see what our award-winning rfxcel Traceability System can do.

Why We Need Wine Industry Track and Trace, Part 1

It was tempting to write about wine industry track and trace as a film noir (or a film pinot noir, as it were). There would be clandestine grape-stomping, midnight rendezvous in terraced vineyards, rogue chemists, cases stuffed with euros and dollars, sting operations and FBI raids, people taken away in handcuffs. In the closing scene, the one-time victim would celebrate triumph over those who did them wrong.

This much drama for wine industry track and trace? Yes, though it’s about much more than the serious work of fighting counterfeits and illicit trade. It’s about using technology to build provenance, streamline operations, and satisfy customers.

Part 1 of our two-part story covers the basics of wine industry track and trace. Part 2 will get into specifics. Let’s start our investigation.

Seriously, why do we need wine industry track and trace?

Not all supply chains are created equal. For example, if you read our Seafood Transparency Trilogy, you know a large, geographically diverse, and fragmented supply chain poses many challenges.

Plus, some products are more complex than others, which means they have more complex supply chains. From raw materials/ingredients to what consumers expect (or demand), supply chains vary wildly depending on what’s being made, where it’s being delivered, and even “the culture” of the product.

As you might have guessed, wine has a complicated supply chain. GS1, in its 2009 Wine Supply Chain Traceability Guideline, said, “The wine supply chain has always been complex and fragmented and with more distant suppliers and ever-more demanding customers, the unique characteristics of this supply chain bring challenges to implementing an effective traceability system.”

If you wanted to get technical, you could argue that there are actually two wine supply chains.

First, there’s a supply chain for “table wine” or “mass market wine.” Depending on where you live, you’ll find these in your local grocery store, in a wine/spirits shop, or in a state-owned store (an “ABC Store,” “package store,” or “state store”). This supply chain has many actors and the product changes hands many times. The product itself changes dramatically as it moves from raw materials to a finished good. Stakeholders typically have access to technology, including track and trace technology.

The second supply chain is for “fine wines,” which are produced in much smaller quantities than table wines. Though these vintages are sold in “regular” wine shops, they’re often reserved for boutique settings frequented by aficionados with deep pockets (or at least bigger budgets they’ve set aside for their passion). The steps of production and distribution may be very localized, resulting in a supply chain with far fewer actors than for mass-produced wine. For example, a winery in Burgundy, France, might do everything from growing the grapes and bottling to distributing pallets, cartons, or cases to local retailers. Because of their size, they may not have access to the latest track and trace technology.

So, why do we need wine industry track and trace? Here are the key reasons:

  • It’s a complex, fragmented supply chain.
  • There are diverse ingredients and raw materials, ranging from fertilizers and water to bottles, corks, and caps — and, of course, grapes.
  • Wine is heavily regulated.
  • Consumers of all stripes want the full provenance for what they’re drinking.

Wine industry track and trace will improve operations for all, ensure compliance with regulations, and satisfy consumer demand for detailed information and transparency.

Two other reasons for wine industry track and trace

Like other industries, wine has business and professional organizations for its supply chain stakeholders. There are trade publications and trade shows. It does big promotions. It has all the trappings of a large, important industry.

Unlike other industries, however, wine has a following. It is more than a product. Wine is a global culture unto itself. And this means there are aspects to its history and very existence that have ramifications for the supply chain.

For starters, there’s a thriving counterfeit market and illicit trade. Granted, this isn’t unique to wine, but the intricacies of the production process and the many facets of supply and demand make it an especially daunting problem. These stories from 2020 give an idea of its scope:

Furthermore, there’s a thriving, passionate collectors’ scene around the world. There’s a huge private trade, in-person and online clubs, mega-exclusive events and dinners, and auctions with nosebleed prices. And there’s lots of money changing hands. A desirable bottle of wine can cost as much as a car. Or a house. The 2019 auction market alone was valued at more than $520 million.

As a cautionary tale that combines the scourge of counterfeiting with the rarefied air of the highest echelons of the wine elite, there’s the fascinating case of Rudy Kurniawan. If you don’t know the story, start here. You might want to grab a glass of wine — just make sure you know where it really came from.

So, counterfeiting and illicit trade are major problems, including in collectors’ circles, where today’s wines are tomorrow’s pricey classics. Provenance, therefore, is vitally important across the supply chain, which is another compelling reason for wine industry track and trace.

Final thoughts

In our faux noir introduction, we said the victim triumphed in the end. What we meant was that wine industry track and trace protects everyone in the supply chain, from winemakers and their trading partners to everyday consumers and auction houses.

Producers can prove the provenance of their ingredients and final products. They can create a story about their wines, connect with consumers, and build and safeguard their brand reputation. Distributors and retailers can maintain the chain of ownership and help ensure only genuine products make it to market, all while streamlining and automating logistics. Consumers can know more about the wines they buy, such as where the grapes were grown, when they were harvested, and if they were treated with pesticides. For fine wines that may become collectors’ items, provenance can be “passed down” as a bottle or case or entire cellar ages, providing much-needed proof that a wine is what it’s label says it is.

As the leader in track and trace technology, rfxcel can help. Our award-winning rfxcel Traceability System is perfectly suited for wine industry track and trace. For example, our Raw Materials Traceability and Finished Goods Traceability solutions create the entire product provenance with detailed data about every aspect of production. Our Integrated Monitoring solution rides along with products as they move through the supply chain, protecting them from environmental excursions, diversion, and theft. With our MobileTraceability app, you can see and control your supply chain from virtually anywhere in the world.

Talk with one of our supply chain experts today to learn more about what we can do. And check back soon for Part 2 of our wine industry track and trace series.

Russia Chestny ZNAK Track and Trace: A Refresher Course

Russia is in the midst of creating the world’s most ambitious — and strict — supply chain track and trace system. Its National Track and Trace Digital System, known as Chestny ZNAK (and sometimes translated as Honest SIGN or Honest BADGE), is on track to be fully operational in 2024. Chestny ZNAK track and trace requirements are tough, and they’ll cover virtually every type of product you can imagine.

No matter what role you play in the supply chain, you have to understand how the system works and what the regulations mandate. Let’s examine Chestny ZNAK track and trace, from its origins to what it requires.

The origins of Chestny ZNAK track and trace

On December 29, 2017, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed Law No. 425-FZ, officially inaugurating the Chestny ZNAK track and trace system. Its goal is to streamline quality control, protect against counterfeits, and monitor supply and demand and expenditure. The regulations cover 12 product categories: medicines, furs, footwear, bottled drinking water, tires, tobacco, dairy, wheelchairs, bicycles, light industry, perfumes, and photo cameras and flashbulbs.

Chestny ZNAK is run by the Center for Research in Perspective Technologies (CRPT), a public-private partnership akin to the European Medicines Verification Organization. Its principal partner, with a 51 percent stake, is business giant USM, which was founded in 2012 and has interests in many of Russia’s key sectors, including metals/mining, telecom, technology, and internet.

According to USM, Chestny ZNAK is the country’s first public-private partnership in the IT sector and the first of its kind at the federal level. Private investments totaling more than 200 billion rubles ($2.5 billion) are expected over the next 15 years.

What are the requirements?

Chestny ZNAK track and trace regulations are arguably the strictest in the world. Companies that do not comply face fines and other penalties, including “deprivation of liberty” (prison), and can in essence be banned from doing business in Russia.

The requirements vary by industry, and deadlines and labeling requirements have changed, but the fundamentals have remained constant: serialization, aggregation, unit- and batch-level traceability, crypto codes, and electronic reporting and records management.

Products must be marked with 2D Data Matrix codes with an 85-character alphanumeric sequence that contains at least four groups of information: a Global Trade Item Number (GTIN), a serial number, a verification key, and a verification code (i.e., crypto code). Furthermore, the owner of goods must create a Universal Transfer Document (UTD) at the moment of ownership, then transfer it to the CRPT.

The crypto codes are an important part of Chestny ZNAK track and trace. At first, every code had to have 88 characters, but a federal decree in August 2019 that amended the procedure for applying drug labelling codes cut the requirement to 44 characters. The CRPT issues the codes, which only authorized representatives can request/receive. rfxcel is an approved partner of the CRPT; more on that below.

For the pharma sector, it’s prudent to note that Chestny ZNAK track and trace requires over-the-counter (OTC) drugs to be labeled, scanned, and recorded in the system. This is a significant departure from the EU Falsified Medicines Directive (FMD) and the U.S. Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA).

These are the broad strokes of the Chestny ZNAK track and trace regulations. There are other requirements — such tracking products with Universal Transfer Documents (UTDs), which must be sent to the CRPT when ownership of goods changes — but we won’t get into those here.

How does it work?

Chestny ZNAK track and trace is a five-step process that calls for complete traceability all the way to consumers. Let’s walk through these steps.

First, the CRPT sends the manufacturer, wholesaler, retailer, or importer — referred to as “economic agents” in the regulations — a unique digital code for every product that must be affixed to the packaging. Only a CRPT-authorized representative can request codes. Every product is logged in Chestny ZNAK’s catalogue of marked goods.

In the second “logistics” step, the digital code becomes an immutable “passport” that legitimizes the product at every step of the supply chain. Every transfer of ownership must be recorded.

Next, the product arrives at the location where it will be sold or dispensed. The receiver scans the item, Chestny ZNAK receives a transfer confirmation, and it’s ready for sale.

Fourth, the product is sold or dispensed. The seller is required to have a point-of-sale cash register, a system connected to the internet that typically includes a touchscreen, a scanner to read 2D Data Matrix codes and other codes, a credit card scanner, and a printer. The product is scanned at checkout and the cash register reports to Chestny ZNAK that “the code has left circulation.” If the scanned data doesn’t match what’s in the catalogue of marked goods, the product is counterfeit or otherwise illegitimate and cannot be sold.

In the last step, the consumer takes over and becomes the final supply chain quality control checkpoint. Using the Chestny ZNAK app for smart devices, described as “your main assistant for product quality tracking and counterfeit detection,” a person scans the 2D Data Matrix code on the product and gets instant access to rich information directly from Chestny ZNAK. If a scan reveals a “violation” — meaning the product is counterfeit or not in compliance with marking regulations —  consumers can report it directly to the CRPT. They can also send questions about how the app works and suggestions to improve it

Here, we want to point out that the Chestny ZNAK track and trace app reminds us of our own MobileTraceability app, only for consumer use. Both can show the date, time, and place of production, the expiration date, and details about the product’s journey from the farm or factory to the store. Our MobileTraceability app is a powerful tool for track and trace in any industry. Check out our short video about how it works in the food and beverage supply chain.

Final thoughts

If you follow our blog or read our news, you know rfxcel is the leader in Chestny ZNAK track and trace compliance. That’s a bold statement, but we think we have the facts to back it up:

  • We’re an official integration, software, and tested solution partner with the CRPT. We’ve demonstrated that our solutions, particularly our signature rfxcel Traceability System (rTS) and Compliance Management (rCM), can meet the stringent Chestny ZNAK track and trace requirements and ensure companies stay compliant.
  • rTS works seamlessly with Chestny ZNAK track and trace, including a Russian-language user interface that makes integration and startup much quicker.
  • We’ve prepared for Chestny ZNAK since 2018.
  • We’re one of the few providers with active implementations in Russia.
  • We’ve tripled our workforce in Russia over the last year. Our team in Moscow provides our clients, which include major global consumer goods and pharmaceutical companies, the quickest time to market while fully automating their compliance reporting.

Contact us today learn more about how we can help you with Chestny ZNAK track and trace. No matter how far along you are in your preparations to meet the requirements, you should talk to us — even if you’re already working with another provider. Our powerful software ensures companies in any industry remain compliant with the complex regulations.

 

Russia Chestny ZNAK and the Dairy Industry

A pilot for dairy products began in July 2019 and ended on December 31, 2020. Mandatory labeling for cheese and ice cream is scheduled to begin June 1, 2021. Labeling for products with specific shelf lives is to begin on September 1 and December 1, 2021. Dairy will be unique because Chestny ZNAK plans to share track and trace duties with another government system.

This short white paper provides details about the dairy category, such as:

2D Data Matrix Codes for Dairy Products

  • Product packaging must have a blank field up to 15×15 mm to accommodate the code.
  • For products in PET bottles, caps must be prepared properly to accommodate either printing or marking with a laser.
  • If a manufacturer has concerns about marking any of its packaging — an unusually shaped carton or bottle, for example — it can submit a sample of the packaging for testing to determine if the codes will adhere to it and if the form factor affects the accuracy/reliability of scanning.
  • Aggregation is required, and the parent-child relationship must be maintained between the aggregation and the individual units within it.

The white paper also has an easy-to-understand overview of the Russian regulations, including its origins, basic labeling requirements, and other aspects relevant to any company that wants to do business in Russia.

rfxcel is the leader in Russian supply chain compliance, and we’ve been prepared for the Chestny ZNAK regulations since 2018. Our powerful rfxcel Traceability System (rTS) platform ensures companies in any industry will remain compliant. Furthermore:

  • We are an official software and integration partner of the Center for Research in Perspective Technologies (CRPT).
  • We are one of only a few providers with in-country implementations.
  • We’ve tripled our workforce in Russia over the last year.
  • Our team in Moscow provides our clients, which include global consumer goods and pharma companies, the quickest time to market while automating their compliance reporting.
  • rTS works seamlessly with Chestny ZNAK, including a Russian-language user interface that makes integration and startup much quicker.

Russia Chestny ZNAK and the Bottled Drinking Water Industry

Russia Chestny ZNAK and the Bottled Drinking Water Industry: How to achieve track and trace compliance in Russia + serialization and aggregation for global players.

Russia’s National Track and Trace Digital System, Chestny ZNAK, covers a wide range of products and industries, including bottled drinking water. The pilot for bottled drinking water began on April 1, 2020, and is scheduled to end on June 1, 2021.

Russia’s regulations have strict standards for serializing and tracing all products manufactured in or imported into Russia. For example, products must be labeled with unique cryptographic (“crypto”) codes. To prepare your products for the Russian market, you must understand the Chestny ZNAK regulations and choose a solution that will fulfill your specific application requirements. This short white paper looks at the principles and approaches for the process of marking and tracing bottled drinking water. It will help you understand Chestny ZNAK’s critical implementation and technological aspects for the bottled drinking water industry.

rfxcel is an official integration, software, and tested solution partner with the Center for Research in Perspective Technologies (CRPT), which manages Chestny ZNAK. We’re also accredited as IT Company by Russia’s Ministry of Digital Development, Communications, and Mass Media. Today, companies are using our track and trace solutions to achieve and maintain compliance. rfxcel transforms business value with a digital supply chain and by helping companies accelerate the process for meeting Russia’s regulatory requirements. As your partner, we’ll safeguard your products while ensuring you remain compliant with Chestny ZNAK.

Bottled Drinking Water Pilot Milestones and Goals

  • Economic agents order 2D Data Matrix codes and apply them to finished products.
  • All information transferred electronically to Chestny ZNAK.
  • Aggregation of products in shipping packages and aggregation of codes for each unit in the aggregation.
  • Marked products enter circulation.
  • Track and trace of products in the supply chain and Universal Transfer Documents (UTDs) to record the transfer of codes between stakeholders.
  • Goods withdrawn from circulation at the time of purchase via communication with point-of-sale cash registers and scanning devices.