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India Track and Trace Requirements Update: APIs, iVEDA, and Barcoding

It’s been a busy year with India track and trace requirements. The Ministry of Health has extended a deadline, announced a new deadline, and released new draft rules concerning key areas of the country’s pharmaceutical regulations.

There are deadlines coming up in the next 6 months, so let’s take a look at what’s happening with these India track and trace requirements..

India track and trace requirements for 2023

The upcoming India track and trace requirements affect three areas of manufacturing: labeling active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), reporting, and product labeling for the Top 300 brands. We’ll go in chronological order:

Labeling APIs: January 2023 deadline

Starting January 1, 2023, all imported and domestically manufactured APIs must be labeled with QR codes “at each level packaging that store data or information.” The government says this will help combat falsified drugs.

This is the culmination of a process that began in June 2019, when the Drugs Technical Advisory Board (DTAB) approved a proposal mandating QR codes on APIs. At that time, DTAB estimated that the regulation would affect approximately 2,500 APIs.

The QR codes must contain 11 data points:

      1. Unique product identification code
      2. Name of the API
      3. Brand name (if any)
      4. Name and address of the manufacturer
      5. Batch number
      6. Batch size
      7. Date of manufacturing
      8. Date of expiry or retesting
      9. Serial shipping container code
      10. Manufacturing license number or import license number
      11. Special storage conditions required (if any)

QR codes will also link to a national database with pricing data from the National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority.

Companies are required to get a GS1 Company Prefix, a unique number that identifies a company as the owner a barcode and the product to which it’s affixed, and a GS1 Global Location Number. GS1 Global Trade Item Numbers will serve as the “unique identification code.”

Reporting to the iVEDA Portal: March 2023 deadline

On April 4, 2022, the Directorate General of Foreign Trade (DGFT) released a public notice that extended to March 31, 2023, the deadline for export reporting to the Integrated Validation of Exports of Drugs from India and its Authentication (iVEDA) portal. The change applies to both small-scale industry (SSI)- and non-SSI-manufactured drugs.

The deadline for this requirement has been postponed at least four times, starting in 2018, when India track and trace requirements centered around another reporting portal, the Drugs Authentication and Verification Application (DAVA). As we reported when iVEDA was launched, the deadline was changed from April 1, 2020, to October 1, 2020. It was changed again in April 2021 and, as we’re discussing now, in April 2022.

Draft regulations for barcoding pharma products: May 2023 deadline

On September 5, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare published draft guidelines for barcoding the Top 300 brands in the country, all of which are named in “Schedule H2” of the announcement. The rules will come into force on May 1, 2023.

The goal of these India track and trace requirements — like so many other regulations around the world — is to combat counterfeiting, diversion, and unauthorized sales. The rules stipulate that eight data points must be incorporated into a “Bar Code or Quick Response Code” to be printed on or affixed to the primary packaging:

      • Unique product identification code (e.g., GTIN)
      • Proper and generic drug name
      • Brand name
      • Batch number
      • Expire date
      • Manufacturer name and address
      • Manufacture date
      • Manufacturing license number

If there is “inadequate space in primary package label,” the codes must be placed on the secondary packaging.

Industry observers have noted concerns with the guidelines, including:

      • QR codes may not be practical for data-dense pharmaceutical labeling.
      • The guidelines may not actually help fight counterfeits, diversion, and unauthorized sales.
      • In order for the eight mandated data points to be readable, labels would have to be unrealistically large — too big to fit on most packages.
      • It’s not clear if 2D DataMatrix codes would meet the requirements for a “Bar Code” in the guidelines.
      • GS1 standards are not required; in fact, they’re not mentioned at all.

To this last point, the initial response seems to point toward a call for GS1 standards: DataMatrix for barcoding, GTINs to identify products, use of two-digit Authentication Identifiers.

Final thoughts

India track and trace requirements are obviously evolving. Expect more changes as the deadlines for APIs, iVEDA reporting, and barcoding get nearer.

But one thing won’t change: India will continue to cultivate its position in the global pharmaceutical industry. Consider these statistics from its Department of Pharmaceuticals 2020-21 Annual Report:

      • The Indian pharmaceutical industry is the world’s third largest by volume and 14th largest in terms of value.
      • It has the second-most FDA-approved plants for generic drug manufacturing outside the United States.
      • It accounts for 60% of global vaccine production.
      • It is the world’s third-largest API market (8% share of global API industry, 500+ APIs manufactured in India, and it contributes 57% of APIs on the World Health Organization’s Prequalified List of APIs).

Our team has worked in the India pharma market for many years and understand its complexities, challenges, and benefits. We have offices and experienced staff in the country. And our signature Traceability System and Compliance Management solution have helped our customers keep up with India track and trace requirements and remain competitive.

Contact us today to lean more about the India track and trace requirements and to arrange a demo. In about 15 minutes, one of our supply chain experts can show you how we can maximize your impact in India.

Join Antares Vision Group at the HDA 2022 Traceability Seminar in October

Antares Vision Group will be at the HDA 2022 Traceability Seminar October 12-14 at the Marriott Marquis in Washington, D.C. We’re an official sponsor, and our team will be there with our latest technologies and solutions. Stop by to meet us!

The HDA 2022 Traceability Seminar brings together healthcare supply chain leaders to learn more about implementation milestones of the DSCSA as distributors, manufacturers, and dispensers implement serialization and traceability technologies.

Attendees also discuss innovative approaches and lessons learned from the first 9 years of the DSCSA rollout and what to expect during the “last mile” of implementation until the November 2023 deadline.

Get the latest DSCSA intel from our experts at the HDA 2022 Traceability Seminar

If you’re reading this, chances are you know that we’ve been leading on the DSCSA since Day 1 and have collaborated with the pharma industry to test key systems, work out kinks, and help all stakeholders prepare. Here are just a few examples:

And it should come as no surprise that Herb Wong, our SVP of product and strategy, will be at the Seminar. He’ll be at our booth, of course, but he’s also doing the “EPCIS Onboarding Across the Supply Chain” panel discussion on Thursday, Oct. 13, from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.

Herb will also host a Friday morning roundtable about DSCSA readiness. Antares Vision Group is sponsoring the day’s Roundtable Discussions (9:35-10:50 a.m.), where you can discuss operational issues associated with traceability implementation. Choose a topic that interests you and rotate through the tables with your peers. Highlights from the discussions will be shared at the end of the session.

With this experience and knowledge, our team wants to answer your questions and show you our solutions while you’re at the Seminar. No matter how far along you are in your DSCSA preparations, time with our team will be time well spent — informative, interesting, and maybe even game-changing.

Final thoughts

We’re just a year away from the final DSCSA deadline and the full serialization of the U.S. pharmaceutical supply chain. The HDA 2022 Traceability Seminar is really the place to be when it comes to the “right now” of the DSCSA for product identification, product tracing, product verification, and requirements for authorized trading partners.

So bring your DSCSA questions for our team and let us know how things are going. Visit our booth. Sit in on Herb’s Thursday EPCIS panel discussion and his Friday roundtable. If you have 3 minutes, take our DSCSA Readiness Survey. You can also check out our DSCSA Compliance Library for all of our resources about the law.

We hope to see you in October!

UAE Tatmeen Track and Trace System: Just the Facts

There’s a deadline coming up for the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system, so we figured it was a good time to take another look at the platform that will, as the government says, “safeguard the entire supply chain.” We’re going to focus on just the facts today. For a more comprehensive look, check out the article we wrote earlier this year.

What is the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system?

“Tatmeen” means “assurance” in Arabic. The Ministry of Health and Prevention (MOHAP) introduced the system in June 2021 “to ensure protection of public health and improve the security of healthcare at all stages.” It will do this by tracking and tracing all pharmaceutical products and medical devices that enter the country.

In addition to MOHAP, three UAE-based organizations are involved in the Tatmeen system:

      • The Dubai Health Authority (DHA) oversees the “complete health sector” in Dubai and promotes engagement with the private sector. Tatmeen will integrate with the DHA’s electronic medical record system and utilize its paperless drug and medical supplies management system.
      • The Department of Health—Abu Dhabi is the regulative body of the healthcare sector in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. It “shapes the regulatory framework for the health system, inspects against regulations, [and] enforce[s] standards.”
      • EVOTEQ is a “digital transformation catalyst” that promotes innovation, including digitalization, particularly in public-private partnerships.

GS1 UAE is also involved, as the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system is based on GS1 standards. This includes using GS1’s BrandSync platform as a central reporting repository.

How does the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system work?

Tatmeen is structured around GS1 barcodes and scanning products as they enter the country and move through the supply chain. Explained simply, the process looks like this:

      1. Manufacturers put a GS1 barcode on every product. Manufacturers are responsible for aggregation. They must obtain a license from MOHAP to import “conventional, biological or other human pharmaceutical products.” As in other countries, this is a multi-step process. See the MOHAP website for more information.
      2. Customs officials scan products to get detailed information and verify they are legitimate before allowing them into the country.
      3. Distributors and logistics providers scan to keep track of inventory, provide another layer of protection, and help ensure products are delivered to the right place in a timely manner.
      4. Healthcare providers at hospitals, clinics, and other facilities scan to verify a product’s legitimacy and expiration date prior to dispensation.
      5. Patients and consumers can also scan to check the safety and authenticity of products.

Tatmeen timeline, next deadline, and news

As we noted above, MOHAP introduced the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system last June. The first deadline was Dec. 13, 2021, when manufacturers and marketing authorization holders had to be registered with the BrandSync platform and begin using 2D DataMatrix codes.

Truth be told, it’s been pretty quiet since then, with industry getting ready for the next deadline — Dec. 13, 2022 — which concerns serial number reporting, aggregation, and Global Location Numbers (GLNs). See our previous article for those details.

Several updated technical documents have been posted on the Tatmeen website this year:

      • Technical Guide for Dispensers (v2.0, March 21, 2022)
      • Technical Guide for Logistics (v3.0, May 30, 2022)
      • Technical Guide for Manufacturers (v4.0, July 6, 2022)

The Tatmeen Serialization Implementation User Guide, “GS1 Barcoding of Conventional Medicines: An Introduction and Reference Guide,” is still in v1.0, dated Aug. 10, 2021.

One notable event was a 4-day Tatmeen workshop held this past June. Co-hosted by MOHAP and EVOTEQ, it gathered representatives from the DHA, the Department of Health–Abu Dhabi, the Emirates Health Services (EHS), and Federal Authority for Identity, Citizenship, Customs and Ports Security to discuss progress made, attracting manufacturers, and connecting stakeholders in the platform.

Speaking at the workshop, Ahmad Ali Al Dashti, assistant undersecretary for the support services sector at MOHAP, and Ali Al Ajmi, director of MOHAP’s Digital Health Department, said the UAE Tatmeen track and trace system is leveraging technology to transform the health sector and continue the country’s position as a role model for assuring the safety of pharma products, including by fighting counterfeits.

Final thoughts

The UAE Tatmeen track and trace system is the perfect example of how the global push for pharmaceutical traceability and serialization is not slowing down. Quite the opposite, in fact.

Sure, some regulations and big deadlines get more attention than others — the U.S. Drug Supply Chain Security Act leaps to mind — but rest assured other countries are hard at work to modernize and digitalize their supply chains. A few examples that we’ve covered recently include Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Egypt, and The African Medicines Agency.

We’re here to help you understand the global regulatory landscape, answer your questions, and help ensure you’re able to do business everywhere you supply chain goes. In terms of the Middle East specifically, we have people on the ground implementing traceability hubs in Lebanon and the Kingdom of Bahrain; we have the know-how to make your supply chain safe, secure, and compliant while optimizing your operations and growing your business.

Contact us today to learn more. In about 15 minutes, we can show you how our automated, intuitive technologies actually make it easy to meet regulations and improve your supply chain.

Why Cosmetics Supply Chain Sustainability Is the Industry’s Hottest Topic

The health and beauty industry is under increasing pressure from regulatory bodies and consumers to maintain and demonstrate due diligence in their supply chains. Forward-thinking companies are responding by making cosmetics supply chain sustainability an integral part of their mission statements and consumer engagement activities.

For example, “The Big 3” are prioritizing cosmetics supply chain sustainability. L’Oréal puts environmental and social performance at the heart of its business to drive value.  Estée Lauder’s mission is “to bring the best to everyone we touch and to support the environment in which we live.” And Unilever reports thoroughly on environmental and ethical statistics, including water, energy, greenhouse gases, waste and plastic packaging, sustainable sourcing, and community investment.

So let’s take a look at  sustainability in the cosmetics supply chain. The industry faces a slew of challenges with sustainability, such as environmental and human rights issues, counterfeiting, an evolving regulatory landscape, changes in consumer behavior, and utilizing new technologies, and all affect their decisions and processes.

What is “sustainability”?

Before we get into cosmetics supply chain sustainability, let’s take a step back for a moment and talk about sustainability generally.

Sustainability might seem to be a relatively new concept, but it has been around since the 19th century, when some industries sought to improve working environments and create less pollution. In the 1960s, new laws and organizational bodies were introduced to address pollution in the United States and Europe.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) “is required under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) to evaluate all major agency actions to determine if they will have a significant impact on the human environment.” Federal agencies implement NEPA and evaluate the possibility for environmental impacts by condcuting categorical exclusions, environmental assessments, and environmental impact statements.

The European Commission says it “aims to ensure coherence between industrial, environmental, climate and energy policy to create an optimal business environment for sustainable growth, job creation and innovation.”

In 2015, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) adopted the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community Blueprint 2025, which “promotes and ensures balanced social development and sustainable environment that meet the needs of the peoples at all times.”

If you read our Global Cosmetics Market white paper, you’ll know why we used the United States, Europe, and Asia as examples: They’re the world’s top cosmetics markets — and their regulators are concerned about sustainability.

What is cosmetics supply chain sustainability?

Cosmetics supply chain sustainability addresses the environmental and human impact of products, from the sourcing and production of raw materials, through to manufacturing, packaging, distribution to the final customer, and post-consumer activities.

Increasingly, there are calls for cosmetics supply chain sustainability standards to be made mandatory. The European Parliament in March passed a resolution to tackle environmental and human rights in EU supply chains. This new Supply Chain Act will require organizations to integrate sustainability into corporate governance and management systems, and frame business decisions in terms of human rights, climate, and environmental impact.

The United States is yet to follow suit, but consumer groups are letting the government know they want tighter standards for the raw materials used in cosmetics.

Even without government mandates, organizations that want to burnish their environmental credentials would do well start with their supply chains. In a January 2021 report called Net Zero Challenge: The Supply Chain Opportunity, the World Economic Forum states that companies wanting to improve their environmental and social performance can look to their supply chains to make cost-effective improvements.

Environmentally responsible production: the rise of “Clean Beauty”

Much of the drive toward sustainability is coming from consumers, who want to know that ingredients are pure (or at the very least safe) and have been ethically sourced. For example, 62 percent of Generation Z consumers (born in the late 1990s) prefer to buy from sustainable brands, and 73 percent will pay more for sustainable products.

In the United States, where the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from being used in cosmetics, there is mounting pressure for stricter regulations. For example, environmental and consumer advocate groups such as the Environmental Working Group (EWG) believe more chemicals should banned, like in the EU, where 1,300+ substances are prohibited from being used in cosmetics.

This is part of larger “Clean Beauty” movement that advocates for safe, clean ingredients and transparency in product labeling. According to a

Clean Beauty is also concerned with ethical sourcing of ingredients. Consumers want reassurance that their cosmetics are not linked to issues such as deforestation, pollution, and animal or child cruelty. The primary problem here is that a wide variety of cosmetic products use a few “core” ingredients, many of which pose unique challenges for achieving sustainability in the cosmetics supply chain. They are difficult to obtain sustainably and ethically, and child labor, poor working conditions, and illegal mining are common.

For example, a 2016 report from the Amsterdam-based nonprofit Centre for Research on Multinational Corporations (SOMO) found that more than 20,000 children are forced to work in mica mines while their families live in severe poverty. Similarly, palm oil, the global market for which is expected to reach $57.2 billion by 2026, has a history of human rights problems. Palm oil is used for moisturizing or texture effects.

As more companies stake their reputations on being sustainable and consumers become more aware and demanding, it’s certain that the call for cosmetics supply chain sustainability will only get stronger.

How can we achieve cosmetics supply chain sustainability?

As we’ve seen, cosmetics companies operate in a challenging environment where many groups — including consumers, perhaps their most important audience — are calling for them to achieve sustainability in their supply chains.

To be successful, they must be able to adapt to changes in the market as technology, product development, and consumer sentiment shape the industry. Whether it’s faster production methods, demand for new products, or desire for ethical and sustainable options, companies must be able to change with the market if they want to survive and succeed.

The key takeaway is that cosmetics supply chain sustainability is not a pipe dream. Technology and solutions exist right now to help companies evaluate their operations and identify strengths, weaknesses, and pain points and take corrective action. These include supply chain digitalization, cloud-based data systems, and real-time monitoring. For instance, a 2021 report by Gartner said that digitalization is a key enabler of agility because it supports a more transparent, automated, intelligent, and orchestrated end-to-end supply chain.

Final thoughts

Sustainability. Consumers want it. More and more regulators are demanding it. It’s good for the planet. It’s good for people. It’s a business best practice.

Is it difficult to attain sustainability? Yes and no. It is a process. It has a lot of moving parts that may require tough decisions. But if a company has the will to be sustainable, it can develop strategies, chart a course, and get to work … and reap the benefits.

Technology is essential for sustainability. rfxcel and Antares Vision Group are committed to helping companies meet their sustainability goals and empowering them to protect product, profit, people, and planet.

Our Traceability System enables you to see and follow everything in your supply chain in real time from virtually anywhere in the world. It makes every product a “digital asset” with a certified, sharable provenance that proves to consumers and regulators that your sustainability initiatives are real and working as intended. Its intuitive, scalable solutions can be used individually or as a complete platform to shepherd sustainability initiatives to completion and create end-to-end traceability, transparency, and visibility.

Contact us today to see how it works. And be sure to check out our other resources about the cosmetics industry, sustainability, and traceability:

What Is the Healthcare Value Chain and Why Is It Important?

In the healthcare sector, delayed, lost, and damaged products can cause grave danger, as patients might not receive the medicines they need on time and many items are susceptible to fluctuations in environmental conditions. That’s why it’s crucial to have a reliable and robust healthcare value chain.

Let’s examine the critical role that the healthcare value chain plays. Our technologies and solutions help pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, and other healthcare stakeholders streamline and manage their entire supply chain, from procurement to distribution.

Understanding the healthcare value chain

Most may believe that the value chain and supply chain are synonymous. However, they are two different terms describing different aspects of supply logistics. The supply chain refers to the movement of goods from suppliers to customers; the value chain encompasses all activities involved in creating and delivering a product or service.

In other words, the supply chain is more about the physical movement of goods and the value chain adds value to a product, including production, marketing, and customer support after the sale. So, the healthcare value chain allows medical institutions to provide patients with the best possible care by ensuring they have the supplies and treatments they need when they need them.

What happens in a healthcare value chain?

Understanding the activities involved in the healthcare value chain is the first step in managing and streamlining its processes. We’re talking about logistics, operations, marketing and sales, and service.

Inbound logistics. The value chain is not a product-driven process, so explaining inbound logistics can be challenging. Generally, inbound logistics in a value chain refers to the quality of inventory and the management of that inventory. Value-driven inbound logistics ensures that all inventory is accounted for and is of the highest quality. This includes checking that items are not expired or damaged and meet all necessary requirements (e.g., internal quality control, standard operating procedures).

Operations. The operations stage of the healthcare value chain is where the actual product or service is produced. In this value-driven scenario, product operations and/or manufacturing aim to reduce waste and create efficiencies. This might involve automating processes, changing production methods, and improving the quality of raw materials. In healthcare, the goal of operations might be to streamline the manufacturing of drugs or medical devices.

Outbound logistics. Like inbound logistics, outbound logistics in a value chain should strive to ensure that a product or service reaches the customer in the best possible condition and in a timely manner. In healthcare, this means making sure that patients receive their supplies and treatments when they need them, as well as ensuring products are safe and legitimate.

It’s also important to note that outbound logistics isn’t just about the distribution of supplies outside a warehouse. It also concerns how medical institutions distribute supplies internally. This is important to consider when managing a hospital or other medical facility.

Marketing and sales. Marketing and sales in the healthcare value chain focus on creating demand for a product or service. Traditionally, this includes advertising, promotions, and other marketing initiatives. In a value-driven context, marketing and sales are strategically designed to go beyond a one-time sale to create long-term relationships with customers. There are numerous ways to do this, ranging from creating educational materials for patients and promoting online services to partnering with insurance providers.

Service. The service stage of the healthcare value chain is where post-sales activities occur, such as continuing customer support, repairs, and maintenance. Value-driven service helps maintain customer satisfaction with the product or service and helps ensure their needs are being met. Customer loyalty programs, follow-up communications, and offering extended warranties are common examples.

The healthcare value chain in numbers

Now that we’ve summarized the different stages of the healthcare value chain, let’s look at some numbers that help illustrate why these processes are so vital to the healthcare industry.

One 2019 report found that clinicians devote about 17 percent of their time to logistics and storage management activities. This affects their productivity and the quality of care they can provide.

The report also found that more than 4,500 different medical devices and products are recalled every year — and 10 percent of these have the potential to cause harm or death. One study published by the well-known consulting outfit McKinsey & Company reported that the “costs of a single non-routine quality event, like a major recall, have been as high as $600 [million] in medical device companies.”

The long-term business benefits of an effective healthcare value chain

An effective healthcare value chain creates benefits beyond improving quality of care and securing patient safety and satisfaction. It creates business benefits, including:

Improved profitability. An effective healthcare value chain can boost a bottom line by improving supply systems, reducing waste, and creating efficiencies across healthcare systems.

Promoting innovation. Less waste and more efficient systems mean savvy companies can devote more resources to R&D that can lead to innovation in all realms, including the development of new treatments or therapies and better manufacturing and distribution schemes.

Helping meet business goals. An effective healthcare value chain contributes to business success by reducing waste, increasing efficiencies, and promoting innovation. It also helps businesses connect with customers and build brand loyalty.

Final thoughts

What’s the main takeaway from this overview of the healthcare value chain? Establishing an agile and robust value chain is essential to success in the healthcare industry — in every industry.

We’ve specialized in creating software solutions for the healthcare value chain (and the healthcare supply chain) for almost 20 years. Our No. 1 priority is to help businesses optimize their operations and improve the quality of the products they manufacture and deliver to consumers.

For the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries, this means providing a digital traceability platform that helps ensure your devices and medications are safe, are transported following proper protocols (e.g., routes and environmental parameters), are delivered on time, and meet all regulatory requirements. It means real-time data and visibility into every aspect of your operations from virtually any location in the world.

rfxcel and Antares Vision Group understand the healthcare value chain, its complexities, and how to optimize it for patient security, customer satisfaction, and business success. Contact us today to schedule a short demo of our solutions. Our experts will answer your questions and show you why major global healthcare and pharmaceutical companies rely on our technology to secure and improve their operations.

 

 

Kazakhstan Serialization and Traceability Requirements, Part 1

We posted an Uzbekistan pharma serialization update the other day. This got us thinking about Kazakhstan serialization and traceability requirements, as Uzbekistan’s neighbor to the north is working to localize production, digitalize its infrastructure, and incentivize continued growth in key sectors, including pharmaceuticals.

So, welcome to the first of our two-part series about Kazakhstan serialization and traceability requirements. As we did in our series about the Africa supply chain, we’re going to start with context — information about the efforts mentioned above and a snapshot of what’s happening with the pharma industry. Part 2 will get into the specifics of Kazakhstan serialization and traceability requirements in pharma and other sectors.

Kazakhstan serialization and traceability requirements in context

To understand Kazakhstan serialization and traceability requirements, we must first understand what the country is doing to foster economic growth, including modernizing its infrastructure,  developing its business enabling environment, and improving the lives of its citizens. Here’s a rundown of what’s been happening.

The Economy of Simple Things

Launched in March 2019, the Economy of Simple Things program is designed to increase domestic production of mostly low-tech, everyday consumer goods and services. The government also hopes to simultaneously boost demand for these goods, decrease reliance on imports, and increase “Made in Kazakhstan” exports.

The program was funded with 1 trillion tenge (almost $2.4 billion in 2019), of which 400 billion tenge (approximately $953 million) was earmarked for manufacturing and services. It was originally slated to end in July 2022 but was extended until the end of 2023.

When Prime Minister Alikhan Smailov announced the continuation, he said the Economy of Simple Things had subsidized more than 1,100 projects valued at almost $2.1 billion, had helped increase production output and payment of taxes by 33 percent and 80 percent, respectively, and had retained and created 67 jobs.

Digital Kazakhstan

Digital Kazakhstan aims to utilize digital technologies to “allow the economy, business, and citizens to enter a fundamentally new development trajectory.” It began in 2018; barring an extension, it will end this year.

The “new development trajectory” means Kazakhstan will work to transition to a digital economy that will improve people’s quality of life. The initiative focuses on five areas, each with publicly stated goals for “What will change/be changed by 2022”:

      1. Digitization of the economy: reorganization of the economy using technology to increase productivity and growth; focused on businesses of all sizes. Example of “what will change by 2022”: Labor productivity will increase to the level of “TOP-30 world countries.”
      1. Transition to the digital state: transformation of infrastructure to provide services for and anticipate the demands of people and business; calls for “open, transparent, and convenient opportunities” that can be accessed online 24/7. Example of “what will be changed by 2022”: Government services available in electronic format will increase by 80 percent.
      1. Implementation of the digital Silk Way: development of a high-speed, secure infrastructure for data transfer, storage, and processing (i.e., internet access and high-quality mobile communications coverage). Example of “what will change by 2022”: ICT development will reach the level of “TOP-30 countries.”
      1. Evolution of the human capital assets: transformational changes to enable a creative society and the “transition to the new realities”; calls for a knowledge-based economy and digital literacy through innovations in education. Example of “what will be changed by 2022”: Digital literacy will increase to 83 percent.
      1. Innovative ecosystem formation: foster a supportive environment for technological entrepreneurship and industry innovation characterized by stable relations between business, academic institutions, and government. Example of “what will be changed by 2022”: The Astana Hub will become an “international park of IT start-ups.”

Promoting pharma independence

According to the United Nations Comtrade database, a repository of official international trade statistics and relevant analytical tables, Kazakhstan’s pharma imports were valued at $1.56 billion in 2020.

The country’s efforts to attain pharma independence date to at least the mid-2010s. In 2014, for example, the now-discontinued State Program of Accelerated Industrial-Innovative Development (SPAIID) aimed to increase the share of domestically produced medicines to 40-50 percent of the overall market.

How far have they come toward that goal? In October 2020, The Asana Times reported that “the share of domestic manufacturers in the procurement of medicines and medical devices has grown to 30 percent and continues to grow steadily.” It also reported the following:

      • In the first eight months of 2020, production volume increased 34.1 percent, reaching 81.5 billion tenge ($190.28 million).
      • Investments into the industry reached 5.2 percent and 4.1 billion tenge ($9.57 million).

For a little more context, consider these stats from an analysis published in early 2021:

      • In 2018, Kazakh pharma manufacturers produced products valued at 42 billion tenge (about $88 million at current exchange rates).
      • In the first 9 months of 2019, the market for finished pharmaceutical products had grown to 460 billion tenge (about $966 million today), a 22-percent year-on-year increase.

To fuel growth, the government in September 2020 adopted the “Comprehensive Plan for the Development of the Pharmaceutical Industry” through 2025. As reported in the Asana Times, the plan includes the following benchmarks:

      • Thirty new large pharmaceutical operations valued at 77.8 billion tenge ($163.4 million in 2020 dollars)
      • Double medicine production to 230 billion tenge ($537.55 million)
      • Triple exports to 75 billion tenge ($175.10 million)
      • Train more than 2,000 specialists and create permanent jobs for them
      • Increase domestic pharmaceutical production to 50 percent in physical terms

Furthermore, then-Prime Minister Askar Mamin directed the government to scale up support for the domestic pharma industry, especially by stimulating clinical and preclinical trials. He also tasked the Ministries of Industry and Infrastructure Development, Healthcare, and Foreign Affairs to incentivize blue-chip pharma companies to set up shop in Kazakhstan.

One last note for further context: Striving for pharma self-sufficiency isn’t a new idea. For example, earlier this year we wrote about Egypt’s Gypto Pharma City. The Egyptian government envisions this “medicine city” as a regional hub for the international pharmaceutical and vaccine industries, calling it “one of the most important national projects … with the aim of possessing the modern technological and industrial capacity in this vital field.”

Final thoughts

On August 8, the Kazakh Trade and Integration Ministry reported that the country boosted its exports to $34.2 billion between January and May 2022, a 37.2 percent increase over the same period last year.

It seems, then, that the Economy of Simple Things, Digital Kazakhstan, and the Comprehensive Plan for the Development of the Pharmaceutical Industry are reaping dividends. They’re promoting the economic vitality that will help propel the implementation of Kazakhstan serialization and traceability requirements across diverse industries, from pharmaceuticals to footwear.

We’ll talk about those requirements next week in in Part 2. In the meantime, take a look at our solutions for Kazakhstan and the other countries in the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU). You can also contact us to schedule a short demo of our technologies — rfxcel and Antares Vision Group are committed to ensuring you’re compliant everywhere you do business.

Antares Vision Group Will Be at GS1 Connect 2022 in San Diego Next Month!

We’re getting excited for GS1 Connect, June 7-9 at the Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina! Not only are we a Premier Sponsor — we’ll be speaking about supply chain traceability and smart hospital systems.

We’ll also be at Booth 115 with our award-winning Traceability System, demonstrating solutions for the food and beverage, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics industries.

So take 20 seconds (really) to sign up to meet us. We have a limited number of discount codes for 10 percent off your registration fee. And while you’re at Booth 115, take our short survey and you could win a $500 DoorDash gift card.

More about GS1 Connect and our speakers

The theme of this year’s conference is “Adapt.” The focus is on how businesses have used GS1 Standards to overcome challenges to thrive in uncertain times. There will be 40+ live sessions (including ours!), 50+ exhibitors (including us!), trading partner roundtables, and other events centered on user stories and leadership insights for supply chain optimization.

As GS1 says, the event is a place to “network with the greatest supply chain minds and learn how to leverage GS1 Standards to optimize your business.” Indeed.

In “Supply Chain Traceability: Can Your Business Survive Without It?” Herb Wong, our vice president of product and strategy, will discuss why traceability is foundational to business success in a rapidly evolving landscape of digitalization, ever-changing consumer expectations and power dynamics, tougher regulations, and supply chain uncertainty. He’ll be speaking on Thursday, June 9, at 1:45 p.m.

In on-demand session 509, “Smarter and Safer Hospitals: When Innovative Technologies Meet Patient Safety, our Digital Healthcare Department Director Adriano Fusco and Dr. Alberto Sanna, director of the Research Center for Advanced Technologies for Health and Well-Being of the IRCCS San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy, will discuss how traceability and GS1 Standards enable end-to-end visibility of medications from arrival at the hospital to dispensation and optimized resources to focus on patient safety.

Final thoughts

We’ve always valued GS1 Standards, and we’ve always ensured our customers can adhere to them and take full advantage of them to maximize efficiency and create value across their operations everywhere they do business.

And who took the time to note the 50th anniversary of the venerable Global Trade Item Number (GTIN)? We did, with a blog post devoted to GS1 barcodes.

As we said in that article, “Where would we be without standards?” We’d love to see you at GS1 Connect and talk about those standards and how they fuel traceability. We hope you’ll take those few seconds to sign up to meet us at Booth 115, get 10 percent off your registration, and enter to win a nice prize when you take our survey.

In the meantime, drop us a line if you have any questions or want to know more about our traceability solutions for pharma, food and beverage, cosmetics, and other industries. We never pass on an opportunity to talk about what makes us your best partner for end-to-end supply chain solutions, from L1 all the way to L5!

See you in San Diego June 7-9!

Understanding the Africa Supply Chain, Part 1

Supply chains are about people. Yes, technology — like the digital solutions we provide — and regulations are important, but people are the true drivers, the alpha and omega. People design supply chains and make them run (efficiently and legally, we all hope). As consumers, people are the final destination of every supply chain; if you don’t understand their needs, wants, and habits, and if your products cannot reach them reliably, you’re out of business. The Africa supply chain is no exception.

In Part 1 of our series about the Africa supply chain, we’re looking at facts and figures about the almost 1.4 billion people on the continent. By understanding the people — where they live, their economies and how they work, and ambitious initiatives that will affect their daily lives — we provide the context for a broader discussion and understanding of the Africa supply chain. Let’s get started.

Africa by the numbers

Geography and population

Africa is big. It’s about 11.7 million square miles (30.3 million square km) total, and about 5,000 miles (8,000 km) from north to south and 4,600 miles (7,400 km) from east to west. Only Asia is bigger: 17.2 million square miles (almost 44.6 million square km).

There are 54 countries in Africa. As we said above, the population is approximately 1.4 billion — that’s about 17 percent of the world population. For comparison, there are roughly 4.6 billion people in Asia, 748 million in Europe, 654 million in Latin America and the Caribbean, 370 million in North America, and 42.5 million in Oceana. Africa is also the youngest continent in the world: The median age is 19.7 years. According to the World Bank, half of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa will be under 25 by 2050.

Africa has the highest growth rate in the world, and its population has increased every year since 2000, when it was approximately 811 million. By 2100, the population will approach parity with Asia. Nigeria is the most populous country, with 206 million people, followed by Ethiopia, which has 115 million. Egypt ranks third — 102 million people — and is the most populous country in in North Africa. (Be sure to read our overview of the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain to learn about what’s happening there.)

The continent is home to between 1,500 and 2,000 languages, about one-third of the world’s languages. At least 75 of those have more than 1 million speakers.

Urbanization

Africa has led the world in urbanization this decade. As of 2021, 609 million people lived in urban areas; this could reach 722 million by 2026. According to the Population Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 22 cities in Africa are expected to grow at an average annual rate of more than 5 percent in the first half of the 2020s, and 58 are expected to grow at 4-5 percent. The two fastest-growing cities in the world are Gwagwalada, Nigeria, and Kabinda, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Cities in Angola, Tanzania, and Mozambique are topping current growth statistics, and by 2035, Africa’s fastest-growing cities are forecasted to be Bujumbura, Burundi, and Zinder, Nigeria.

Proliferation of mobile technology

According to the GSMA, an association representing mobile network operators around the world, 495 million people — 46 percent of the population — were subscribed to mobile services in Sub-Saharan Africa at the end of 2020. This was an increase of almost 20 million over 2019. By 2025, adoption of 4G will double to 28 percent (the global average is 57 percent), and 5G will reach 3 percent of total mobile connections.

GSMA reports that 40 percent of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa is under the age of 15. Overall, Africa’s very young population will drive mobile use. Importantly, we can also assume that this demographic will use their mobile devices for everything from banking and shopping to entertainment, creating opportunities for companies to connect to consumers and involve them in the Africa supply chain.

Economy

Pre-pandemic, United Nations statistical data showed that Africa’s economy grew by about 3.4 percent in 2019, “creating one of the longest stretches of uninterrupted positive economic expansion in [the continent’s] history.” This helped fuel a growth of the middle class year over year.

In 2020, Africa experienced a 3.4 percent contraction in gross domestic product (GDP).

According to the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Industrial Development Report 2022: The Future of Industrialization in a Post-Pandemic World, the pandemic has caused considerable output loss in Africa, as it has in most of world. Here are projected output losses by 2021 for the “economy groups” in Africa:

    • North Africa (four economies): 7.3 percent
    • Less-developed countries (14 economies): 6.8 percent
    • Sub-Saharan Africa (12 economies): 6.4 percent

For perspective, estimated output losses were 7.5 percent in West Asia (5 economies), 4.1 percent in Northern and Western Europe (4 economies), 2.7 percent in North America and Pacific (4 economies), 10.3 percent in less-developed countries in Asia, and 1.4 percent in China.

According to a quick online survey of Africa-based websites, the top job sectors on the continent are agriculture, which accounts for 15 percent of GDP; infrastructure; mining; service; banking and finance; information and communications technology; entrepreneurship; entertainment; and tourism. See here and here for more information.

In 2020, 453 million people were employed in Africa, with the majority in Eastern Africa. The two most populous countries, Nigeria and Ethiopia, had the highest working populations, about 56.6 million and 51.3 million, respectively.

According to the World Bank, regional growth in Africa projections look like this:

    • Sub-Saharan Africa: Growth for 2022 and 2023 will remain just below 4 percent.
    • East and Southern Africa: Growth of 3.4 percent in 2022; excluding Angola and South Africa, 4.3 percent growth is expected in 2022.
    • West and Central Africa: Growth of 5.3 percent in 2022; the West African Economic and Monetary Union (Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte D’Ivoire, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Niger, Senegal, and Togo) is projected to grow at 6.1 percent in 2022. Nigeria is expected to grow by 2.9 percent (African Development Bank Group).

Agenda 2063 and the Africa Supply Chain

Agenda 2063 “is Africa’s blueprint and master plan for transforming Africa into the global powerhouse of the future.” It is being implemented through five 10-year plans, the first of which is scheduled to end next year. Many of its Flagship Projects relate to modernizing and expanding infrastructure; therefore, they are directly related to the Africa supply chain. For example:

African High-Speed Train Network: The network will connect all countries’ capitals and commercial centers, including connecting the 16 landlocked countries to major seaports and neighboring countries.

Single African Air-Transport Market (SAATM): The goal is “the full liberalization of intra-African air transport services in terms of market access [and] traffic rights for scheduled and freight air services by eligible airlines, thereby improving air services connectivity and air carrier efficiencies.”

Continental Commodities Strategy: The goal is to move Africa away from being a raw materials supplier to “developing [its] commodities as a driver for achieving the structural, social, and economic transformation of the continent.” Integrating into regional and global value chains is a key part of the strategy.

The African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA): The goal is to accelerate intra-African trade and boost Africa’s “trading position in the global market by strengthening [its] common voice and policy space in global trade negotiations.” Thirty-six countries had ratified the AfCFTA agreement as of February 5, 2021.

Final thoughts

To understand your supply chain, you have to understand people. We hope this overview of Africa was informative, showing where people live, how they work, the continent-wide trends, and what’s being done to ensure the Africa supply chain better serves every person in all 54 countries.

Everything we’ve talked about today influences the Africa supply chain; however, urbanization could be the most telling and important. As cities continue to grow — remember, urban populations are projected to reach 722 million by 2026 — people will demand more access to goods and services, and the supply chain will have to respond nimbly and efficiently. The proliferation of mobile devices and networks, especially among young people, is another important driver.

rfxcel understands supply chains. The technology, the regulations, and how they affect people. Move on to Part II of our Africa supply chain series, where we discuss recent developments and regulations in specific countries. And be sure to contact us if you have any questions or want a short demonstration of our solutions. We’d love to hear from you.

Last but not least, take a look at our other news from the Africa and Middle East region:

Egypt Pharmaceutical Supply Chain: News and Regulations

If you follow our blog (and we know you do), you’ve probably detected a theme over the last few days: global pharma compliance. We’ve written about Russia Chestny ZNAK, United Arab Emirates Tatmeen, Uzbekistan ASL BELGISI, and our rfxcel DSCSA Compliance Library. Today, we’re looking at the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain. Let’s get started.

Notable news about the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain

Last August, Egyptian Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouli told a gathering of government officials that the country would prioritize the “localization” of the pharma industry. He said President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi had tasked the government with developing an executive plan to this end.

It seems to be working: the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain is enjoying strong growth. Last month, Egyptian Drug Authority (EDA) Director Dr. Tamer Essam said the country’s pharma exports had risen to 35 percent, an all-time high. “There is no medicine in the world or vaccine that is not manufactured in Egypt,” he said. In February 2021, the EDA announced it was launching an export subsidy initiative and had begun reviewing and updating all export procedures to ensure they complied with global regulatory requirements.

In April 2021, the head of the General Division of Drug Traders at the Federation of Egyptian Chambers of Commerce (FEDCOC), Ali Auf, said Egypt produced about 85 percent of its pharmaceutical needs domestically (and imported only 15 percent).

Auf made these statements two days after President Sisi inaugurated Gypto Pharma City, which embodies Egypt’s drive for pharmaceutical self-sufficiency. Situated on roughly 44.5 acres in Khanka, about 20 miles from Cairo, it’s one of the largest “medicine cities” in the region. It has facilities for production, administration, industrial services, and networks.

Egypt envisions Gypto Pharma City as a regional hub for the international pharmaceutical and vaccine industries, calling it “one of the most important national projects … with the aim of possessing the modern technological and industrial capacity in this vital field.”

The Egyptian Pharmaceutical Track & Trace System

The goal of the Egyptian Pharmaceutical Track & Trace System (EPTTS) is end-to-end traceability and product authentication across the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain to reduce counterfeits, increase efficiency, and protect consumers. Appropriately, this dovetails into what the government has said about Gypto Pharma City — that it will “help citizens obtain high-quality and safe pharmacological treatment, end monopolistic practices, and control the prices of medicines.”

At first, the Ministry of Health and Population managed EPTTS; however, Law No. 151 of August 2019 essentially transferred those duties to the newly formed EDA. (It also created another organization, the Egyptian Authority for Unified Drug Procurement, a “centralized procurement and supply interface.”) The EDA was initially affiliated to the prime minister, but Presidential Decree 18/2020 of January 2020 gave it more autonomy.

The EDA “inherited” three organizations from the Ministry of Health and Population:

    • The Central Administration of Pharmaceutical Affairs (CAPA) registers pharma products, issues licenses for the establishment of pharma entities, and licenses the import and export of pharma products. It’s also responsible for regulating prices and evaluating clinical trials and studies of drugs.
    • The National Organization for Drug Control and Research (NODCAR) works to ensure the quality, safety, and effectiveness of pharma products, cosmetics, and insecticides. NODCAR must certify every pharmaceutical product before it can be registered, marketed, advertised, distributed, imported, or exported.
    • The National Organization for Research and Control of Biologicals (NORCB) monitors, inspects, and releases all biological products for human or animal use, such as vaccines.

Like most countries, the Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain follows GS1 labeling standards, characterized by Global Trade Item Numbers (GTINs), Serialized Global Trade Item Numbers (SGTINs), 2D DataMatrix codes, GS1-128 barcodes, serial shipping container codes (SSCCs), and Global Location Numbers (GLNs). It is also using GS1’s Electronic Product Code Information Services (EPCIS) standard.

Secondary packaging must be marked with a 2D DataMatrix code with the GTIN, expiry date, batch number, and a randomized serial number. EPTTS’ original plan was to require these data points to be presented in a specific sequence, but this was nixed. Cases and pallets must have a GS1-128 barcode or a DataMatrix code with the SSCC.

EPTTS requires aggregation, including maintaining the parent-child relationship, but has yet to provide details. We’re also waiting for specifics about some aspects of serialization, including if serial numbers can be reused.

For data and compliance reporting, supply chain actors are required to submit data to a GS1 Global Data Synchronization Network (GDSN) database. They must upload photos — as many as six of them — that clearly show the product packaging and other details, including the GTIN, brand name, storage instructions, country of origin, product name, and any warning statement. To date, however, the government hasn’t published specifications for communicating with the EPTTS database.

A pilot to test EPTTS was held from December 1, 2019, to January 12, 2020. Participants have shared feedback, but there hasn’t been much movement since. GS1 Egypt and the EDA are apparently still working on the implementation guidelines, which are now in their third iteration.

Final thoughts

The Egypt pharmaceutical supply chain regulations are a work in progress, and we’ll continue to follow developments and share updates when there’s concrete news.

But as we said in our overview of UAE Tatmeen, the global push for pharmaceutical traceability and serialization is continuing at a furious pace. If you’re a manufacturer, a distributor, a third-party logistics provider, a dispenser — any actor in the supply chain — waiting for Egypt or any other country to formalize their regulations is not a wise strategy. You have to have a solution now, preferably one that will work in every country.

That’s what our Traceability System does. Our supply chain experts can demonstrate in a few minutes how it automates compliance and optimizes just about every other aspect of your operations. Contact us today to see it in action. And continue following our blog. We’ll be writing more about global pharma regulations in the coming weeks (and months and years).  For example:

Uzbekistan Traceability Update: Pharma Serialization Begins Feb. 1, 2022

Note: On February 7, 2022 — just 10 days after we posted this article — Uzbekistan’s State Tax Committee announced that it was “extending the timeframe for the phased introduction of mandatory digital markings” for pharmaceutical products. The February 1 deadline is longer in effect for this product category. Read the details here.

 

On February 1, 2022, Uzbekistan traceability requirements for medicines and medical devices will go into effect. It’s the latest compliance deadline in the country’s push for serialization and digital marking regulations that will affect an array of industries. Here’s a breakdown of the law and the latest Uzbekistan traceability updates.

The Uzbekistan Traceability System: ASL BELGISI

The Uzbekistan traceability system is called ASL BELGISI. It’s managed by CRPT Turon, the equivalent of Russia’s Center for Research in Perspective Technologies (CRPT), which manages Russia’s National Track and Trace Digital System (Chestny ZNAK).

On November 20, 2020, the Uzbekistan government published Decree PKM-737, “Establishment of Obligatory Digital Labeling.” It mandates serialization for tobacco products; alcohol, including wine and wine products; beer and brewing products; appliances; medicines and medical devices; and water and soft drinks.

Furthermore, it requires supply chain participants to register with a national catalog of labeled goods; when an application is approved, the participant receives an account and is granted access to the system.

According to the CRPT Turon website, the “main task” of ASL BELGISI “is to guarantee consumers the authenticity and declared quality of the purchased products.” Like Chestny ZNAK, consumers can download a mobile app to scan products, report suspect products, and provide feedback about the system.

Marking requirements

Uzbekistan traceability requirements mirror those mandated in Chestny ZNAK. All domestically produced and imported goods must be marked with DataMatrix codes that are traced across the supply chain through a four-step process:

    1. CPRT Turon assigns a unique DataMatrix code to each product and the manufacturer or importer places it on the packaging.
    2. The product’s movements are traced throughout the supply chain, from the factory or point of importation to the consumer, via scanning of the DataMatrix code.
    3. Retailers scan the codes when products are stocked and sold.
    4. Consumers can use the ASL BELGISI app to check a product’s legitimacy (i.e., confirm that it’s not a counterfeit) and access product information.

To get DataMatrix codes, participants must be registered with ASL BELGISI, describe the goods in a national catalog of labeled goods, then formally order the codes and apply them to the products. The codes must be applied to packaging or a product label according to the ISO/IEC 16022-2008 “Automatic identification and data capture techniques – Data Matrix bar code symbology” specification. At present, each DataMatrix code costs 68 som (excluding VAT), which is quite literally a fraction of a U.S. dollar: $0.0063.

Like its Russian counterpart, ASL BELGISI uses “verification keys” and “verification codes.” These are also commonly known as crypto codes. CRPT Turon generates these codes.

Generally, the DataMatrix codes for products in every regulated industry must include four data points:

    • A 14-digit product code (i.e., Global Trade Item Number, or GTIN)
    • A 13-character randomized serial number generated by CRPT Turon or a supply chain participant
    • A four-character verification key generated by CRPT Turon
    • A 44-character verification code generated by CRPT Turon

For aggregation, a Serial Shipping Container Code (SSCC) number must be provided in a one-dimensional barcode following the ISO 15394:2009 “Packaging – Barcode and two-dimensional symbols for shipping, transport and receiving labels” specification.

Regulated industries and key dates/requirements

Uzbekistan traceability regulations currently apply to five product categories: tobacco; alcohol, including wine and wine products; beer and brewing products; appliances; medicines and medical devices; and water and soft drinks. Below, we list the latest information about each category.

Filter cigarettes
    • January 1, 2021: only labeled products may be produced and imported
    • July 1, 2021: manufacturers may ship only labeled products to wholesalers
    • October 1, 2021: distributors may ship only labeled products to retailers
    • January 1, 2022: sale of unmarked cigarettes is prohibited
    • October 1, 2022: mandatory labeling for all types of tobacco products
Alcohol
    • January 1, 2021: only labeled products, including wine and wine products, may be produced and imported
    • December 1, 2021: alcoholic beverages packaged in metal containers, including aluminum containers, must be labeled
    • December 1, 2021: aggregation required for alcoholic beverages, including wine and wine products
    • November 1, 2022: aggregation required for alcoholic beverages packaged in metal containers, including aluminum containers
Beer and brewing products

Mandatory labeling began on April 1, 2021.

Appliances

A pilot for appliances began on July 1, 2021. Mandatory labeling is being introduced in phases. Vacuum cleaners, refrigerators, freezers, washing machines, TVs, and monitors were required to be labeled beginning December 1, 2021.

Medicines and medical devices
    • June 1, 2021: 6-month pilot for medicines and medical devices begins
    • January 28, 2022: CRPT Turon announces that the pilot is officially closed
    • February 1, 2022: only labeled products may be produced and imported

CRPT Turon reported that, during the pilot, all participants successfully registered with ASL BELGISI and registered agreed-upon product in the national catalog of labeled goods. They also successfully installed marking equipment on production lines, trained employees to use the equipment, and released batches of properly labeled, serialized products.

More about the requirements for medicines and medical devices

In addition to a DataMatrix code that includes a 14-digit product code (i.e., GTIN), a 13-character randomized serial number, a 4-character verification key, and a 44-character verification code, packaging must have a human-readable GTIN, lot number, expiration date, manufacturing date, and serial number.

Digital marking must be applied directly to packaging on the production line in a “specially designated place” and not be larger than 10×10 millimeters. The codes must be affixed in a way that prevents them from being separated from packaging during the entire shelf life of the product. Codes may not be printed on external packaging material, including transparent film/wraps, and my not be obscured by other information.

Water and soft drinks

This product category includes bottled water, soft drinks, and fruit and vegetable juices.

    • June 1, 2021: pilot for water and soft drinks begins
    • March 1, 2022: only labeled products may be produced and imported

Final thoughts

In June 2021, CRPT Turon announced that it had issued more than 350 million codes, including more than 200 million for tobacco products, almost 130 million for alcohol products, and approximately 20 million for beer products.

As of today (January 28, 2022), it reports that it has issued nearly 583 million codes for tobacco products, more than 300 million for alcohol products, almost 143 million for beer products.

These figures illustrate a simple fact: Strict serialization and traceability regulations are here to stay in Uzbekistan. Russia has led the way with Chestny ZNAK, which arguably has the world’s toughest supply chain requirements, and we should watch the regulatory landscape in the other Newly Independent States (NIS) — Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Ukraine.

As we said above, ASL BELGISI, the Uzbekistan traceability system, mirrors Russia’s Chestny ZNAK. rfxcel is an undisputed leader in Chestny ZNAK compliance. Consider these facts:

  • We’re an official CRPT partner for medications, bottled drinking water, tobacco, footwear, tires, light industry, perfumes, dairy, bicycles, and wheelchairs.
  • We’ve demonstrated to the CRPT that our solutions for traceability and compliance meet its stringent requirements.
  • We’re accredited as an IT company by Russia’s Ministry of Digital Development, Communications, and Mass Media.
  • We’re one of the few providers with active implementations in Russia (e.g., major global consumer goods and pharmaceutical companies).
  • We have an ever-growing Moscow-based team that knows the regulations and brings expertise in key areas of supply chain management and technology.
  • We’ve led the way in thought leadership with white papers and industry updates and information. (See the list below for a sample.)

We’ve also developed end-to-end traceability and compliance hubs for governments that want to lock down their supply chains with the best digital technologies and solutions. Read more about those here and here.

Contact us today to learn more about our traceability and compliance solutions. Our digital supply chain experts will share a short demo of our award-winning Traceability System and show you how to remain compliant and agile no matter where you do business.

A sample of our Chestny ZNAK coverage