Food and Beverages Whitepapers Archives - rfxcel.com
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Blockchain Based Supply Chain Traceability

Blockchain Based Supply Chain Traceability:

Blockchain is here to stay, and companies in diverse industries are either investigating how they might benefit from its strengths or have already invested in using the technology in their operations.

As you probably know, a key appeal of blockchain is its ability to maintain immutable records in a decentralized fashion. For supply chain traceability, blockchain allows the provenance of any product to be easily demonstrated with and supported by immutable, tamper-proof data. This not only improves product safety, expedites regulatory compliance, and helps prevent counterfeiting, fraud, and waste — it enhances transparency and visibility, and creates new possibilities to engage consumers with compelling, verifiable product stories.

This white paper provides an overview of the origins of blockchain, from its earliest applications in cryptocurrency and recordkeeping, and discusses how it has transitioned into other industries, including supply chain management. In so doing, we hope to demystify blockchain, which despite its growth and the “buzz” surrounding it, remains opaque to many.

We also examine rfxcel’s Blockchain solutions, our proprietary, platform-agnostic solution that helps customers and their partners ensure that they can interface with blockchain applications. You’ll see how our solutions improve end-to-end supply chain traceability, visibility, and transparency, and learn how it can work in the pharmaceutical, food and beverage/agribusiness, consumer goods, and government industries.

Our trust in the items we consume, from prescription drugs and organic foods to name-brand designer goods, depends on the reliability of supply chains. For almost 20 years, rfxcel has committed itself to making supply chains safer, faster, and more traceable and transparent. We recognize the potential of blockchain and will work with you when you’re ready to see how it might benefit your operations.

 

Russia Chestny ZNAK and the Bottled Drinking Water Industry

Russia Chestny ZNAK and the Bottled Drinking Water Industry: How to achieve track and trace compliance in Russia + serialization and aggregation for global players

Russia’s National Track and Trace Digital System, Chestny ZNAK, covers a wide range of products and industries. The regulations have strict standards for serializing and tracing all products manufactured in or imported into Russia. For example, products must be labeled with unique cryptographic (“crypto”) codes.

To prepare your products for the Russian market, you must understand the Chestny ZNAK regulations and choose a solution that will fulfill your specific application requirements. This short white paper looks at the principles and approaches for the process of marking and tracing bottled drinking water. It will help you understand Chestny ZNAK’s critical implementation and technological aspects for the bottled drinking water industry.

rfxcel is an official integration, software, and tested solution partner with the Center for Research in Perspective Technologies (CRPT), which manages Chestny ZNAK. Today, companies are using rfxcel’s track and trace solutions to achieve and maintain compliance. rfxcel transforms business value with a digital supply chain and by helping companies accelerate the process for meeting Russia’s regulatory requirements. As your partner, we’ll safeguard your products while ensuring you remain compliant with Chestny ZNAK.

Bottled Drinking Water Pilot Milestones and Goals

  • Economic agents order 2D Data Matrix codes and apply them to finished products.
  • All information transferred electronically to Chestny ZNAK.
  • Aggregation of products in shipping packages and aggregation of codes for each unit in the aggregation.
  • Marked products enter circulation.
  • Track and trace of products in the supply chain and Universal Transfer Documents (UTDs) to record the transfer of codes between stakeholders.
  • Goods withdrawn from circulation at the time of purchase via communication with point-of-sale cash registers and scanning devices.